The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

We’re playing catch-up. Read More

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One row at a time, a specialized tractor harvests the tough fibrous stalk of hemp plants. The tractor blades flip the hemp and cut it down 5 inches off the ground. This creates a layer of air underneath that helps the hemp stock dry naturally. This is the first of many steps in the process to usable fiber. Photo: Lloyd Belcher
The Elwha River has been dam-free for less than two decades  whereas the Hoh River—running from the flanks of Mount Olympus to the Pacific Ocean on the Olympic Peninsula’s western edge—remains one of the state’s few uninterrupted rivers, largely due to its location in Olympic National Park. Photo: Colin Wiseman

Saving One River: Hoh Steelhead in Decline

By Colin Wiseman   |   Aug 17, 2019 August 17, 2019

“Nature provides a free lunch, but only if we control our appetites.” —William Ruckelshaus, first administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency A coho salmon the size of my pinky drifts quietly in the shade. It’s hardly distinguishable from the sand below. But Marie-France Roy, a professional… Read More

Across the valley from the 18 Road trail system—home of the ultra-iconic Zippity Do Dah —is Kokopelli’s  Trail, another Fruita classic. Mary’s Loop is just a part of the loop, but the views of the Colorado River make it a standout, especially at sunset. Photo: Carl Zoch

“Life of Pie”: Jen Zeuner and Anne Keller Q&A

By Katie Klingsporn   |   Aug 15, 2019 August 15, 2019

In a fossil-rich corner of western Colorado, set against lush agricultural fields, the big-box stores of Grand Junction and the sandstone formations of the Colorado National Monument, you’ll find Fruita. These days, the town is an international mountain-biking destination known for its ribbony, high-desert trails, technical routes overlooking the Colorado… Read More

This illustration by Matt Blease appears in full in the Patagonia August 2019 Gear Guide.

Recycling Is Broken. Now What?

By Michele Bianchi   |   Aug 14, 2019 August 14, 2019

Patagonia is no stranger to the difficulty of throwing stuff away. We take back 100 percent of the gear you return for recycling through our Worn Wear program. In 2018, we recycled 6,797 pounds of products. But we can’t recycle or repair everything you send us. Some… Read More

Krissy Moehl and Grant Guise run the inaugural takayna / Tarkine ultramarathon. Photo: Jarrah Lynch

If You Love It, Run for It

By Krissy Moehl   |   Aug 13, 2019 August 13, 2019

Krissy Moehl reports from the inaugural takayna ultramarathon “There are no footprints.” Fellow Patagonia ambassador and New Zealand native Grant Guise voiced what I was thinking. Our headlamps and phone lights dimly illuminated the overgrown double-track from Rebecca Road. “If 100 people are starting a race in five minutes, we… Read More

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“I was just about to get speared when Tom Hannagan, from Friends of Ironwood Forest, whipped out a metal comb he always carries with him to brush cactus barbs away. We had the best time there with Tom and Dave Barker from Friends. We laughed a lot, and their love of the area and the time they spent hiking with us made it a really memorable trip.” —Maya Nerenberg, Size and Fit Specialist. Photo: Geoff Holstad

Designers at Work

By Malcolm Johnson   |   Jul 30, 2019 July 30, 2019

Lately, the future of America’s public lands has been very much on our minds. There’s been a bit of good news, but mostly no end to the threats to public lands and waters and disruptive changes coming out of Washington, DC. Read More

Five-thirty a.m. looking good from my tent the second morning of GoWild 2018. Photo: Kirsten Van Horne

Growing Pains

By Kirsten Van Horne   |   Jul 17, 2019 July 17, 2019

 In our 1990 summer catalog we said, “It’s up to us to make sure that children don’t go tree hungry, that they have wild places and opportunities to be in them. Once they do, they will amaze us with their caring. They need not wait to grow up to be… Read More

The first wildlife overpass put in on the People’s Way Partnership project along Highway 93 in Montana. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes declared that the highway was a visitor on the landscape and any future improvements needed to consider the need of wildlife first. In this spirit, the tribes worked closely with the Montana Department of Transportation and created the densest collection of wildlife crossing structures in North America. Bears, deer, elk, bobcats and others are already using the structures. Photo: Steven Gnam

A Measure of Hope

By Senator Tom Udall   |   Jul 16, 2019 July 16, 2019

As the great Aldo Leopold once said, harmony with the land and with wildlife “is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left.” Yet here we are: humankind is now the singular driving force behind the potential extinction of more than one… Read More

The last straw. Meredith Wiltsie wiring the damn muffler en route to the Ruby Mountains, Nevada. Photo: Gordon Wiltsie

Where He Landed (on Mars)

By Bonnie Tsui   |   Jul 15, 2019 July 15, 2019

Rule #1 of a road trip: Vehicle may break down. Rule #2 of a road trip: You may break down along with it. Near the Ruby Mountains in Nevada, Gordon and Meredith Wiltsie were struggling with wrenches and wire after the muffler came loose on their old International Travelall. As… Read More

Photo Courtesy Dave Murray

The Long, Happy March of Barefoot Dave

By Doug Chadwick   |   Jul 12, 2019 July 12, 2019

Dave Murray lives in a wooded mountain valley in western Montana with his wife, Connie; a labradoodle rightly named Loki, after the Norse god of mischief; and a bunch of mules. I live 140 miles north near Glacier National Park. He and I met on a float trip down a… Read More

Photo: Will Strathmann

Challenging Adversity

By Kitty Calhoun   |   Jul 12, 2019 July 12, 2019

As I labored under the weight of a heavy pack and took my turn breaking trail in the soft snow in the quest to establish a new route on a Himalayan peak, I was also mired in self-doubt. I was with three men who were much stronger than me, and… Read More

When you've got free-running rivers and an abundance of alpine trails, there isn't much time to kick back. But on the lazier days, the 13th Avenue Book Box is how Smithers, B.C. keeps on reading. Photo: Malcolm Johnson

The Books in Our Bags

By Patagonia   |   Jul 5, 2019 July 5, 2019

If your idea of a great summer read is, like a day in the waves, a little escape from it all, this post may not be right for you. Maybe there’s just no escaping the severity of the climate crisis, or maybe we’re just so glad to have time to… Read More

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