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In 2008 the National Forest Service designated the upper part of the Path of the Pronghorn migration route as the country’s first designated wildlife corridor. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act seeks to build on this legacy. Photo: Joe Riis
For Lindsay Rose Medoff, the idea for ReCrafted has been a dream 11 years in the making. Photo: Lauren Ross

Second Stories

By Patagonia   |   Oct 18, 2019 October 18, 2019

What if we could wear our garbage? That’s the idea behind ReCrafted, our line of clothing created made from the scraps of used garments collected at our Worn Wear facility in Reno. It’s premium, Patagonia, upcycled. A second life for products that might not otherwise get one. ReCrafted was created… Read More

Fifth-generation Nebraskan farmer Del Ficke converted his operation to no till in 1986. A year later, every farm within 10 miles followed suit. Courtesy Del Ficke

Don’t Till on Me

By Andrew O’Reilly   |   Oct 17, 2019 October 17, 2019

Del Ficke is a soil junkie. “It’s like a drug the first time you feel real good soil,” he says. “You get it in your hands and can feel how good it is. You can smell it and taste it. You just want to take a big old hit of… Read More

Sri Lankans outside flooded homes in Kaduwela. The massive storm that hit Sri Lanka in May of 2017 triggered the worst flooding and landslides in 14 years in the southern and western parts of the island. Extreme weather events like this one are increasing in number and strength due to human-caused climate change. Photo: Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images

It’s Time We Prepare Our Workers

By Patagonia   |   Oct 15, 2019 October 15, 2019

Hear “climate crisis” and you may picture a skinny polar bear stranded on a fragment of sea ice, bleached coral reefs, burning forests or maybe a world without bees. You’re not wrong: All those things (and more) are sadly unfolding or could be in the coming decades. Even more troubling,… Read More

The Athabasca oil sands near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. Tar sands are heavy crude oil deposits found mixed with sand, clay and water, which need to be removed through extensive processing. Mining this oil is destructive to the land, carries a heavy carbon footprint and can release toxic by-products. Photo: Ben Nelms/Getty Images

Not Another Pipeline

By Lisset Fun   |   Oct 14, 2019 October 14, 2019

Thirteen youth climate activists are taking to the courts to protect the Mississippi River and the people who depend on it for survival.  Brent Murcia crosses the lively Mississippi River every day by bridge on his walk to class at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. The sunset sometimes paints… Read More

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The 1964 red-cover guidebook was Yosemite Valley’s first collection of climbs. Photo: Mikey Schaefer

The Red Book

By Timmy O’Neill   |   Oct 10, 2019 October 10, 2019

Lessons from Yosemite’s first climbing guidebook “I have this idea,” Mikey texted last October. “Let’s climb all of the suggested routes from the Yosemite red-cover guidebook.” I agreed immediately. The tattered copy of A Climber’s Guide to Yosemite Valley arrived in the mail less than a week later. First published in… Read More

Léa Brassy sharing smiles at the small harbor on Isla Alejandro Selkirk. Photo: Daniel Russo

Los Plástico

By Léa Brassy   |   Oct 9, 2019 October 9, 2019

Five hundred miles off the Chilean coast, there’s a small island that carries the name of a famous castaway. It’s a stark place surrounded by thriving seas and powerful surf, and when Léa Brassy, Ramón Navarro and Kohl Christensen traveled there to ride waves,… Read More

Activists hold up protest signs at the climate strike in Berlin, Germany. More than 1.4 million people are estimated to have participated in climate strikes in Germany. Photo: Courtesy of Patagonia

Now What?

By Ryan Gellert   |   Oct 8, 2019 October 8, 2019

As we look back on a week of climate actions that mobilized more than 7 million people around the world, those of us who took part are asking ourselves: What next? I ask that question of myself, as a concerned citizen, as a father and as a business leader in… Read More

Young activists gather a week before the September 20 Global Climate Strike in New York City to build artwork, such as banners or screen-printed scraps of cotton fabric for participants to pin to their clothes. This is one of the three art builds that took place in different NYC boroughs. Photo: Keri Oberly

Unimaginable

By Madalina Preda   |   Oct 7, 2019 October 7, 2019

Around 50 high-school and middle-school students were sitting in a circle on the floor of the basement of the New York Society for Ethical Culture in New York City. It was a Wednesday evening two days before the Global Climate Strike scheduled for September 20, and this was the last planning… Read More

Katrina Van Wijk punches through thin ice while trying to make it to the middle of the river. Photo: Jasper Gibson

Paddle, Suffer, Ski

By Jasper Gibson   |   Oct 2, 2019 October 2, 2019

The rumble of the diesel engine fades out of earshot, giving way to our new solitude: Just us, the frozen river, our kayaks (fully loaded with ski mountaineering gear, camping supplies, rations for five people and all the needed accoutrement for 18 days in the Boundary Range) and hundreds upon… Read More

Jane Jackson tops out an unmanned V2 overlooking the year-round Canadian River. In the background are a few remaining Osage orange trees from the Mills Orchard Ranch. Photo: Eric Bissell

Roy, New Mexico

By Eric Bissell   |   Sep 27, 2019 September 27, 2019

The patchwork history of public lands that transformed the area around a small New Mexico town into a world-class bouldering area We left the Mills Canyon Rim Campground, where we’d been living for three cold January weeks, just before dawn on our last morning in New Mexico. I pulled over… Read More

The volunteer team, made up of climbing rangers, Climber Stewards and volunteers, look at the massive pile of trash amassed from one of the many caches atop El Capitan. Photo: Eric Bissell

Cache vs. Trash

By Jane Jackson   |   Sep 25, 2019 September 25, 2019

On an incredibly clear, early autumn morning, the aging Yosemite Search and Rescue (YOSAR) van bumped along Tioga Pass Road, taking precariously tight turns at an alarming speed. Twelve of us were crammed in the back, chattering and bracing ourselves against the van’s interior walls. When the road was no… Read More

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