The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

We’re playing catch-up. Read More

https://www.patagonia.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/belcher_l_0027.jpg
One row at a time, a specialized tractor harvests the tough fibrous stalk of hemp plants. The tractor blades flip the hemp and cut it down 5 inches off the ground. This creates a layer of air underneath that helps the hemp stock dry naturally. This is the first of many steps in the process to usable fiber. Photo: Lloyd Belcher
”There’s nothing like having a sisterhood of women who love you and support you unconditionally. No matter what happens they’ll always be there, reminding me to follow my heart. It’s hard to describe how empowering it is to have such dynamic, powerful women in my life who want to lift me up into the best version of myself.” —Liz Clark. Photo: Justin Turkowski

Sea Sisters

By Kimi Werner   |   Jun 19, 2019 June 19, 2019

The Best Times Are About Friends, Not Perfection It had been four years since Liz Clark, Léa Brassy and I first spent time together, on a sailing trip through the Tuamotus. We knew we’d found something special from the moment we… Read More

After months of restoration work, the 45-foot canoe U’i undergoes precise measurement during the waterline test that confirmed she was ready to race once more. Ke’ehi Lagoon, Hawai’i. Photo: John Bilderback

Labor of Love

By Ben Wilkinson   |   Jun 17, 2019 June 17, 2019

Restoring a traditional Hawaiian koa canoe. Ka Wahine u‘i O Hale‘iwa, which roughly translates to “Beautiful Young Woman of Hale‘iwa,” is the pride and joy of the Manu O Ke Kai Canoe Club here in Hale‘iwa on the North Shore of O‘ahu. Carved from a single koa tree, U‘i’s life… Read More

The US recycling collection rate for plastic bottles is less than 30 percent. These bottles are among the lucky few that made it to a recycling facility to be melted down and turned into recycled polyester gear. This fall season, 69% of Patagonia’s line, by weight, will be derived from recycled materials. Photo: Lloyd Belcher

What We’re Doing About Our Plastic Problem

By Patagonia   |   Jun 13, 2019 June 13, 2019

Our home planet has a deeply disturbing and pervasive problem with plastics. In April, a group of researchers studying the deepest part of the ocean—the Mariana Trench—discovered plastic bags and candy wrappers floating nearly seven miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean. Globally, about 450 million metric tons of plastic are produced every… Read More

Levi Ginnis Jr. scouts the area along the Yukon River in search of moose. The hunt and the stories of Gwich'in families taking a stand to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge are the main focus of the film Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee. Photo: Greg Balkin

Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee

By Madalina Preda   |   Jun 10, 2019 June 10, 2019

Indigenous communities across the United States are increasingly confronted with threats to their sovereignty and to the places they rely on for their culture and way of life. Nowhere is this threat felt more than in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We interviewed Len Necefer, PhD, founder and CEO of Colorado-based outdoor… Read More

@patagonia
Anne Gilbert Chase and Brittany Griffith get the beta on Alam Kuh from Iranian climbers Habibi and Sholmaz, friends and partners from Tabriz. During our time at base camp, we got to know Habibi, Sholmaz and many other Iranian climbers, who would come by our camp to welcome us to Iran and the Alborz Mountains, and to talk about climbing, life and politics. We were a fascinating anomaly, but being climbers made us break that down. Photo: Beth Wald

Finding Refuge in Iran

By Beth Wald   |   May 29, 2019 May 29, 2019

Fog from the distant Caspian Sea swirled around us as we left the road, crossed a narrow mountain stream on a rickety footbridge of wornwooden planks, passed a pungent corral full of dank, scruffy sheep, and started the steep climb to Alam Kuh base camp in the Alborz mountain range… Read More

Spring time in the Sierra. Photo: Christian Pondella

The Sierra Snow Wolf

By Max Hammer   |   May 24, 2019 May 24, 2019

On the west face of Mount Whitney, just off the summit of the highest peak in the lower 48, we had to traverse right. For us skiers it was no real issue, a bit of sidestepping and poling would do the trick. Yet, our group was comprised of both two… Read More

From the Fall 1984 catalog, Julie Galton and friends show off their brightly colored Baggies after rolling around in a patch of mud by the Colorado River. Photo: Chris Brown

Under the Mud

By Rachel G. Horn   |   May 14, 2019 May 14, 2019

Julie Galton hadn’t been to a Patagonia store in years when she realized she needed some new Baggies™ for her upcoming summer trip to the Colorado River with her son. But when she went to Patagonia.com to grab a few pairs, she was unexpectedly greeted by a familiar face. Hers. It was the only… Read More

Phones and social media were instrumental to the organizers of the Youth Climate Strike US who learned about climate change by doing research online and used social media to mobilize tens of thousands of like-minded kids across the country. From left to right: Maddy Fernands, 15, Isra Hirsi, 16, Karla Stephan, 14, (top right) and Nadia Nazar, 16, all organizers of the strike in Washington, D.C. Photo: Matt Eich

The Last Generation

By Prince Shakur   |   May 1, 2019 May 1, 2019

On March 15, spirits are high among a group of friends in Washington, D.C. Isra Hirsi, 16, Haven Coleman, 13, and other teen girls sprint to the lawn of the Capitol Building after a morning meeting at a nearby cafe. They laugh as they walk and chant, “Whose planet? Our… Read More

Growing hemp is easy. This fibrous plant needs no pesticides or irrigation and requires low quantities of fertilizer. But turning hemp into fabric is a complicated task that requires an expertise American farmers will need to regain. Photo: Lloyd Belcher

Hemp Is Back

By Diane French   |   May 1, 2019 May 1, 2019

It’s hard not to notice the hype around hemp today. Pick up any lifestyle magazine, enter a pharmacy, talk to a health-food store employee or just the person next to you in yoga class—at some point you’ll learn about its miraculous powers. In particular, near-unbelievable claims swirl around cannabidiol, or… Read More

A wild female Chinook salmon surges upstream toward the spawning grounds. Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Photo: Eiko Jones

What’s a Fish Eater to Do?

By Langdon Cook   |   Apr 24, 2019 April 24, 2019

When Kevin Davis was a kid growing up in southeast Louisiana, recycling meant filling the pickup with trash and driving down to the river to dump it. Just the same, he and his neighbors had a reverence for the wild. “We prided ourselves on being hunter-gatherers,” he says. He’d bring… Read More

Anne Keller and Jen Zeuner enjoying postride beers at Pizza Point on the Kokopelli Loops. Photo: Carl Zoch

Life of Pie

By Diane French   |   Apr 19, 2019 April 19, 2019

Friday night at the Hot Tomato is not for those in a hurry. Hungry customers grip pints of beer and compare notes on the day’s rides in lines that spill into the parking lot. Music pumps and the staff whirls behind the counter, tossing floury dough, yelling requests to the… Read More

LOADING
ERROR