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In 2008 the National Forest Service designated the upper part of the Path of the Pronghorn migration route as the country’s first designated wildlife corridor. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act seeks to build on this legacy. Photo: Joe Riis
Sunrise over a snow-adorned Crater Lake is surreal. On the morning of day two, Kael Martin arrived just in time to watch the landscape light up, then made a few turns above the caldera. Due to both avalanche-hazard and soil-erosion concerns, travel below the caldera rim is not allowed. But there are a few slopes that are positioned just right, to make turns within sight of the water without crossing any boundaries. Photo: Colin Wiseman

Backcountry Lunch

By Colin Wiseman   |   Sep 20, 2019 September 20, 2019

Sampling the Offerings at Crater Lake “Go for Dirksen…” There was considerable static on my little two-way radio, but it was a small miracle we could hear Josh Dirksen at all. We hadn’t seen him since a dinner rendezvous two days prior in Bend. An agreed-upon radio… Read More

Lesser known than the First Divide and Third Divide trails, the Second Divide Trail isn’t part of the Downieville Classic courses—and thus remains somewhat of a secret gem for those looking to get away from the crowds. Chelsea Jolly traverses above the swimming pools and fall colors of Second Divide. Photo: Ken Etzel

Making Dirt Magic: Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship

By Sakeus Bankson   |   Sep 19, 2019 September 19, 2019

Greg Williams looks like a miner. Or a logger. Not the type you’d envision sitting in an enormous backhoe or lumber truck; with a black beard reaching halfway down his chest and an affinity for shovels, picks, Pulaskis and other tools of the dirt-moving trade, he would look as natural… Read More

Much of what we sell is grown, and that’s why we’re investing in regenerative organic agriculture, a set of farming methods that conserves water, restores topsoil and removes carbon from the atmosphere. How much CO2 can “regen ag” really draw down? We’re finding out at family-owned cotton farms like the one where this photo was taken near Madhya Pradesh, India. Photo: Tim Davis

How We’re Reducing Our Carbon Footprint

By Patagonia   |   Sep 18, 2019 September 18, 2019

Ever since Patagonia had an office (and wasn’t just selling gear out of the back of Yvon’s car), we’ve devoted desk space, our free time and a percentage of our sales to protecting wild nature. From our travels, we knew our land, air and water was in real trouble from… Read More

To the barricades. A women’s march reached a police blockade on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, North Dakota, in 2016. The #NoDAPL protests focused on Indigenous rights but also the reckoning we’ll all face as the climate crisis intensifies: Do we defend oil companies—or fresh water? Photo: Colin McCarthy

The Climate Crisis Is a Human Issue

By Bill McKibben   |   Sep 16, 2019 September 16, 2019

Thirty years ago this month, I published my first book, The End of Nature, which was also the first book for a general audience about what we then called the greenhouse effect. And my main worry was about … nature. In 1989, global warming was still a… Read More

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The SS Tell the Truth, launched by Extinction Rebellion (XR), gets the message across during the shutdown of Oxford Circus in London. XR demands governments tell the truth about the climate crisis, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2025 and convene a Citizens’ Assembly. Photo: Lauren Marina/Extinction Rebellion

Are You Arrestable?

By Sarah Hartigan   |   Sep 12, 2019 September 12, 2019

I ink an uppercase Y on the sign-up sheet in the box next to my scribbled name. The letter stands for the word “yes.” Yes, I’m willing to get arrested. Yes, I’m in a dimly lit bar in Studio City, California. Yes, I’m here for a nonviolent climate-activist training session… Read More

Activists gathered in Turin, Italy this spring for a global day of strike demanding world leaders take bold action on the climate crisis. The demonstration is one of many organized by Fridays for Future, a movement of students who strike from school every Friday. Photo: Stefano Guidi/Getty Images

Why They Strike

By Madalina Preda   |   Sep 11, 2019 September 11, 2019

There’s something undeniably cute about kids protesting. They paint their signs—and faces—in primary colors, add some glitter. They smile and laugh as they huddle for selfies. Yet if they seem playful, they’re also serious. The millions of young people who’ve taken to the streets in the last year know that… Read More

I found an old index card in my Sierra High Route book that read: Dobbiamo credere nei miracoli prima di osare chiederne uno, an Italian phrase meaning, “We must first believe in miracles before having the audacity to ask for one.” Photo: Ken Etzel

FFFKT*

By Jenn Shelton   |   Sep 6, 2019 September 6, 2019

*Fastest Fish Fourteener Known Time I picked it up on a whim at the ranger station in Bishop 2012. I was there finagling a permit that would look more or less legal for my attempt to break the men’s speed record across the John Muir Trail starting the next day. Read More

Pristine tributaries of the Chilkat River are threatened by the Palmer Project because sulfide mines produce toxic sludge that must be kept out of waterways to avoid devastating the ecosystem. Photo: Connor Gallagher

The Chilkat’s Fight Against the Palmer Project

By Tim Gibbins   |   Sep 5, 2019 September 5, 2019

Klukwan is a village of 90 people in Southeast Alaska that’s home to the Chilkat Indian Village, a federally recognized tribe, on the banks of the Chilkat River 22 miles north of Haines, Alaska. The Chilkat have lived in the Chilkat Valley for over 2,000 years. It’s a land of… Read More

Located in a stunning, glacially-forged valley in southwest Iceland, the Laxá in Kjós is considered one of the best small salmon streams in the world. The wild Atlantic salmon, sea trout and views, however, are anything but diminutive. Photo: Oskar Sveinsson

The Final Frontier for Wild Atlantic Salmon

By Madalina Preda   |   Sep 4, 2019 September 4, 2019

In the last 20 years, the expansion of salmon farming in open-net pens has led to the loss of half the wild salmon population in Norway. On average, 200,000 farmed fish escape from open-net pens and many of them swim up rivers in Norway and breed with… Read More

Alex sticks the iconic crux move—a dead point off a right-hand mono to a terrible pinch—on the FA of Perfecto Mundo, one of the hardest routes in the world. Photo: Ken Etzel

There Is Only Send or Fail. Just ask Alex Megos

By Alex Lowther   |   Sep 2, 2019 September 2, 2019

Alex Megos is driving his aging Volkswagen down the curvy roads that thread the valleys of the Frankenjura. It’s June in rural Bavaria, where rolling green meets broad blue. The pavement reveals an occasional storybook village arrayed around a church steeple. Alex has made this hour-long trip,… Read More

The proposed goldmine site in Greencastle, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. Dalradian Gold Limited has already started underground mining operations to test the quality of the ore at Curraghinalt in the Sperrin Mountains. Photo by Friends of the Earth Ireland

Gold Diggers in Northern Ireland

By Tony Butt   |   Aug 29, 2019 August 29, 2019

If you are interested in exploiting somebody else’s land, you can find convenient ratings tables that tell you the current favorites, ranked by competitive taxes, efficient permitting procedures and certainty around environmental regulations. In other words, if a country has low taxes for the rich, a no-questions-asked permit policy and… Read More

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