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It Was Always About Oil, Coal, Gas and Uranium

It Was Always About Oil, Coal, Gas and Uranium

By Lisa Pike Sheehy   |   Mar 29, 2018 March 29, 2018

In December of 2017, the president illegally reduced Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments by nearly two million acres. Despite overwhelming support from the majority of Americans, nearly three million of whom spoke up during a public comment period in favor of protecting our national monuments,… Read More

Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, aka Kid Warrior, is a climate activist, a hip-hop artist and the youth director of Earth Guardians. Photo: Earth Guardians

The Year of Youth

By Cora Neumann   |   Mar 9, 2018 March 9, 2018

This February, Patagonia announced the launch of Patagonia Action Works to a packed house in Santa Monica, California. It isn’t easy to pack a house in Los Angeles, with the traffic and long distances many people have to travel on a busy Friday night. But… Read More

Activists have been fighting against the construction of the Kaminoseki nuclear power plant for 35 years. Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. Photo: Keiko Nasu

Sea of Miracles

By Patagonia   |   Feb 28, 2018 February 28, 2018

“After dinner, the round-faced, quirky old professor pulled his necklace out of his shirt,” says Sea of Miracles director, Dan Malloy. “It was a small clay flute shaped like a football. He announced that he would be performing an old Japanese protest song. The room went silent. He… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Endangered Spaces: Prince of Wales

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Jan 26, 2018 January 26, 2018

“It’s like being caught in a spiderweb. You’ll find yourself pushing with every part of your body, and no part of your body will be able to move. You’re totally trapped by–held by plants,” says Elsa Sebastian, describing what it’s like to bushwhack through a 25-year old clear cut in… Read More

The enormous amount of ice that carried all these rocks over the course of hundreds of years has now melted away. Photo: Vincent Colliard

Glacier Retreat

By Léa Brassy   |   Jan 18, 2018 January 18, 2018

Experiencing places myself is the ultimate chance for imprinting the reality of them in my mind. Living for a year on a remote atoll in the Pacific allowed me to witness the seawater level rising and its consequences. Yet picturing what’s happening far across the world remains abstract for me. Read More

Members of the Porcupine caribou herd crossing the Hulahula River in the Arctic Refuge. Caribou travel in groups and migrate at different times: Pregnant females, some yearlings and barren cows are the first to travel north toward the coastal plain, followed by males and the rest of the juveniles. Photo: Florian Schulz

The Fight to Protect the Arctic Refuge Has Just Begun

By Patagonia   |   Dec 27, 2017 December 27, 2017

“Americans have voiced overwhelming support for protecting the Arctic Refuge, and the fight is far from over. If we destroy the Arctic Refuge today, we will never get that wild, unspoiled wilderness back.” —Rose Marcario, President and CEO of Patagonia On December 20, Congress passed the tax bill… Read More

View from Bluff, Utah, of Cottonwood Wash which was part of the original Bears Ears National Monument, but is now outside of protection. This area is now a target for energy development. Photo: Josh Ewing

Response to the House Committee on Natural Resources

By Yvon Chouinard   |   Dec 19, 2017 December 19, 2017

December 19, 2017 Rob Bishop Chairman U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources 1324 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Dear Chairman Bishop and the House Committee on Natural Resources, I find it disingenuous that after unethically using taxpayers’ resources… Read More

Students from Patagonia, Chile, and the Klamath River Basin form long-lasting bonds while confronting the challenges and joys of paddling 120 miles of the Klamath River. Photo: Ben Lehman

From Ríos to Rivers: Two Worlds United for the People of the River!

By Juanita Ringeling Vicuña   |   Dec 18, 2017 December 18, 2017

At first glimpse, the Klamath River in the United States’ Pacific Northwest and the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia, South America, seem to have nothing in common. Separated by more than 10,000 miles, their waters drain basins that are drastically different. One river begins in a sagebrush desert before weaving… Read More

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