The Cleanest Line

Activism

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Tania with her two new cubs shortly after their birth. The first jaguars born in decades in Iberá, their arrival was a major milestone for the Jaguar Reintroduction Program. When they’re released into the wild—hopefully within two and a half years—they’ll have access to 650,000 acres of habitat teeming with caimans, capybaras and other native food sources. Photo: Courtesy Tompkins Conservation

Rewilding Iberá

By Sebastián Di Martino   |   Oct 3, 2018 October 3, 2018

It’s spring in the wetlands of Iberá, and two young jaguar cubs appear filled with trepidation and curiosity as they follow their mother, Tania, into the water for their first swim. Aramí, which means “little sky” in the native Guaraní language, and Mbareté, or “strong,” are the first cubs born… Read More

Photo: Greg Von Doersten

Judge Ends Grizzly Hunts with Ruling That’s Bigger Than Bears

By Todd Wilkinson   |   Sep 27, 2018 September 27, 2018

So far in this young century, few wildlife conservation issues have galvanized more Americans than whether or not Western state governments ought to allow grizzly bears to be hunted again. On Monday, September 24, 2018, U.S. District Judge Dana L. Christensen in Missoula, Montana, resolved the matter for the foreseeable… Read More

Photo: Andrew Burr

The Brave Women of Bosnia

By Molly Baker   |   Sep 26, 2018 September 26, 2018

Activism and the feminine spirit unite to save Europe’s last wild rivers. Mornings in Fojnica, Bosnia-Herzegovina, bring a harmony of Franciscan monastery bells and the broadcast of Fajr prayer, the valley draped in fog and wood smoke. As the fog lifts, hills speckled with the first yellows of fall appear, sloping… Read More

Photo: Tim Davis

Time to Vote

By Rose Marcario, CEO   |   Sep 24, 2018 September 24, 2018

Today, 150 leading companies are coming together in support of a vital common goal: getting more people out to vote. By joining the nonpartisan Time to Vote campaign, businesses from Walmart to Lyft as well as small businesses from coast to coast have made real commitments to help employees and… Read More

The biointensive garden at Parque Patagonia in summer, from above. More than 30 different crops in an orchestra of flavors. Photo: James Q Martin

The Garden at the End of the World

By Javier Soler   |   Sep 11, 2018 September 11, 2018

If the present status-quo of soil loss, carbon pollution and planetary warming continue, we’re looking at just 60 more harvests before we can no longer grow 95 percent of the food we humans rely upon to live. At the same time, the way to prevent this calamity is at hand:… Read More

Photo: Michael A. Estrada

The Original Tree Huggers

By Michael A. Estrada   |   Sep 4, 2018 September 4, 2018

When you hear the term “tree hugger,” what—or who—do you see? What image, or images, pop into your head? It likely starts with the vague idea of folks who are often—and perhaps overly—passionate about protecting nature. But then, if you expand it, what do they look like? Is it a… Read More

San Rafael Wilderness. Photo: Matthew R. Sayles

Bright Spots and Battlegrounds for California Conservation

By Obi Kaufmann   |   Aug 29, 2018 August 29, 2018

Depending on how you look at it, California’s most beloved wildlands are either under siege or experiencing a wellspring of support. In the current political atmosphere, bursting with assaults on bedrock environmental laws and protected public lands, it seems particularly important to recognize and spread the word about whatever pockets… Read More

Illustration: Geoff McFetridge

Three Guides for Going B—And Why It Matters

By Patagonia   |   Aug 27, 2018 August 27, 2018

Our company is proud to be part of the growing movement of Certified B Corporations. These companies practice “stakeholder capitalism”: They identify their most deeply held social and environmental values, then abide by them, honoring their responsibilities to their employees, customers, suppliers and communities—as well as to… Read More

A highly sociable, capable and forward-thinking creature, the Yellow-Framed Pedaler has been known to build, ride and share trails in California’s Downieville area. Photo: Scott Markewitz

All Hands on Deck

By Sacha Halenda   |   Aug 15, 2018 August 15, 2018

The mottled splotches of dark brown and grey that dot the back of the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog let it transform into a lichen-covered rock, a shadow on a stream bed or a leaf on the forest floor. Not being noticed is a handy trait when you are the food-chain… Read More

Members of the Smith family haul a net nicely loaded with sockeye, Kvichak River, Bristol Bay, Alaska. Photo: Corey Arnold

Rites of Summer, One Welcome, One Not

By Tim Sohn   |   Jul 27, 2018 July 27, 2018

The start of a Bristol Bay fishing season is always an enervating mix of excitement and uncertainty, but for the past decade-plus, a larger uncertainty has loomed: the proposed, but still theoretical, Pebble Mine, a massive open pit mine that would sit near the headwaters of Bristol Bay’s river systems… Read More

The Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest (ID) will determine which streams to protect for potential Wild and Scenic designation through their forest plan over the coming year. American Whitewater has identified around 30 rivers and creeks in the Forest, including Three Links Creek (pictured), with outstandingly remarkable values and is advocating for their protection. Photo: Trip Kinney

Critical Mass: Strapping it together

By Sarah Gilman   |   Jul 26, 2018 July 26, 2018

American Whitewater, a small but scrappy nonprofit, has learned the first step toward protecting a beloved river is to help make waves. If you flip through early issues of the American Whitewater Journal, published quarterly by the nonprofit American Whitewater since its founding in 1954, you’ll discover several things. One… Read More

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