The Cleanest Line

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Photo: Michael A. Estrada

The Original Tree Huggers

By Michael A. Estrada   |   Sep 4, 2018 September 4, 2018

When you hear the term “tree hugger,” what—or who—do you see? What image, or images, pop into your head? It likely starts with the vague idea of folks who are often—and perhaps overly—passionate about protecting nature. But then, if you expand it, what do they look like? Is it a… Read More

San Rafael Wilderness. Photo: Matthew R. Sayles

Bright Spots and Battlegrounds for California Conservation

By Obi Kaufmann   |   Aug 29, 2018 August 29, 2018

Depending on how you look at it, California’s most beloved wildlands are either under siege or experiencing a wellspring of support. In the current political atmosphere, bursting with assaults on bedrock environmental laws and protected public lands, it seems particularly important to recognize and spread the word about whatever pockets… Read More

Illustration: Geoff McFetridge

Three Guides for Going B—And Why It Matters

By Patagonia   |   Aug 27, 2018 August 27, 2018

Our company is proud to be part of the growing movement of Certified B Corporations. These companies practice “stakeholder capitalism”: They identify their most deeply held social and environmental values, then abide by them, honoring their responsibilities to their employees, customers, suppliers and communities—as well as to… Read More

A highly sociable, capable and forward-thinking creature, the Yellow-Framed Pedaler has been known to build, ride and share trails in California’s Downieville area. Photo: Scott Markewitz

All Hands on Deck

By Sacha Halenda   |   Aug 15, 2018 August 15, 2018

The mottled splotches of dark brown and grey that dot the back of the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog let it transform into a lichen-covered rock, a shadow on a stream bed or a leaf on the forest floor. Not being noticed is a handy trait when you are the food-chain… Read More

Members of the Smith family haul a net nicely loaded with sockeye, Kvichak River, Bristol Bay, Alaska. Photo: Corey Arnold

Rites of Summer, One Welcome, One Not

By Tim Sohn   |   Jul 27, 2018 July 27, 2018

The start of a Bristol Bay fishing season is always an enervating mix of excitement and uncertainty, but for the past decade-plus, a larger uncertainty has loomed: the proposed, but still theoretical, Pebble Mine, a massive open pit mine that would sit near the headwaters of Bristol Bay’s river systems… Read More

The Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest (ID) will determine which streams to protect for potential Wild and Scenic designation through their forest plan over the coming year. American Whitewater has identified around 30 rivers and creeks in the Forest, including Three Links Creek (pictured), with outstandingly remarkable values and is advocating for their protection. Photo: Trip Kinney

Critical Mass: Strapping it together

By Sarah Gilman   |   Jul 26, 2018 July 26, 2018

American Whitewater, a small but scrappy nonprofit, has learned the first step toward protecting a beloved river is to help make waves. If you flip through early issues of the American Whitewater Journal, published quarterly by the nonprofit American Whitewater since its founding in 1954, you’ll discover several things. One… Read More

The Una and its tributaries are certainly wadable and offer amazing trout and grayling fishing, especially in the upper parts in Una National Park. Photo: Jonas Borinski

Save the Blue Heart of Europe: Una, The One

By Jonas Borinski   |   Jul 17, 2018 July 17, 2018

Bosnia? Isn’t that one of those war-stricken, ex-Yugoslavia states? Hmm, I don’t know much about it but it doesn’t sound too tempting. That’s what I thought when Patagonia sales rep Christof Menz contacted me in early 2016 with the idea to make a fly fishing film about… Read More

Kingfish are an MSA rebuilding success story for both commercial and recreational fishing interests. Photo: Brandon Shuler

Boom & Bust: Healthy Fisheries Demand Strong Conservation

By Dr. Brandon D. Shuler   |   Jun 26, 2018 June 26, 2018

As luck would have it, I was born into one of those families that has a healthy addiction: fishing. When asked, “When did you start fishing?” I have no answer. It’s always been there. Like most fly anglers, I cut my teeth on conventional gear, throwing artificials while sitting in… Read More

Michael O’Casey of the Oregon Natural Desert Association removes old barbed wire fencing in the Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Area in southeastern Oregon. Taking out fencing left behind by past grazing operations allows native wildlife to move freely through the landscape once again. Photo: Sage Brown

Helping Hands in the High Desert

By Patagonia   |   Jun 21, 2018 June 21, 2018

As you leave the lowlands, headed upward and eastward, the land around you changes into something markedly different—with the Cascades as a divider, the thick forests of the coast and the fertile fields of the Willamette Valley give way to the open rangelands, rock outcrops and dry, snaking canyons of… Read More

Photo: Peter Mather

In the Land of the Wolverine

By Tom Glass   |   Jun 19, 2018 June 19, 2018

Thumping along a frozen river by snowmachine, I’m winding my way into the heart of the Brooks Range in Northern Alaska. Riding snowmachines is a surprisingly busy activity, weight constantly shifting, eyes staring hard into the flat light, and today my decadent wrapping of goose down and full-face helmet with… Read More

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