The Cleanest Line

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The Una and its tributaries are certainly wadable and offer amazing trout and grayling fishing, especially in the upper parts in Una National Park. Photo: Jonas Borinski

Save the Blue Heart of Europe: Una, The One

By Jonas Borinski   |   Jul 17, 2018 July 17, 2018

Bosnia? Isn’t that one of those war-stricken, ex-Yugoslavia states? Hmm, I don’t know much about it but it doesn’t sound too tempting. That’s what I thought when Patagonia sales rep Christof Menz contacted me in early 2016 with the idea to make a fly fishing film about… Read More

Kingfish are an MSA rebuilding success story for both commercial and recreational fishing interests. Photo: Brandon Shuler

Boom & Bust: Healthy Fisheries Demand Strong Conservation

By Dr. Brandon D. Shuler   |   Jun 26, 2018 June 26, 2018

As luck would have it, I was born into one of those families that has a healthy addiction: fishing. When asked, “When did you start fishing?” I have no answer. It’s always been there. Like most fly anglers, I cut my teeth on conventional gear, throwing artificials while sitting in… Read More

Michael O’Casey of the Oregon Natural Desert Association removes old barbed wire fencing in the Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Area in southeastern Oregon. Taking out fencing left behind by past grazing operations allows native wildlife to move freely through the landscape once again. Photo: Sage Brown

Helping Hands in the High Desert

By Patagonia   |   Jun 21, 2018 June 21, 2018

As you leave the lowlands, headed upward and eastward, the land around you changes into something markedly different—with the Cascades as a divider, the thick forests of the coast and the fertile fields of the Willamette Valley give way to the open rangelands, rock outcrops and dry, snaking canyons of… Read More

Dispatches from the Edge of the World

By Meaghen Brown   |   Jun 5, 2018 June 5, 2018

The wind at the edge of the world comes in clean and cold. Without any significant landmass to temper its force, it rips across the 40th latitude and slams into the prefab houses that straddle the tiny seaside township of Arthur River where we’re staying. It strains against the windows… Read More

Photo: Peter Mather

In the Land of the Wolverine

By Tom Glass   |   Jun 19, 2018 June 19, 2018

Thumping along a frozen river by snowmachine, I’m winding my way into the heart of the Brooks Range in Northern Alaska. Riding snowmachines is a surprisingly busy activity, weight constantly shifting, eyes staring hard into the flat light, and today my decadent wrapping of goose down and full-face helmet with… Read More

Filleting the catch of the day. Photo: Dave McCoy

The Freedom to Live Off the Land

By Mike Wood   |   Jun 7, 2018 June 7, 2018

When I was a kid, the Connecticut River was my Yukon. I spent many days working alongside the river or canoeing its islands and backwaters in search of crabs, snapper, blues, ducks and alewives—amazing silvery fish that brave the depths of the Atlantic to feed and grow and then return… Read More

While exploring the reef, Belinda Baggs and Kimi Werner were surprised by the sudden appearance of a young humpback whale. Photo: Jarrah Lynch

The Reef Beneath

By Wayne Lynch   |   May 9, 2018 May 9, 2018

You know, it’s strange, you grow up as a kid in Australia and you see all these photos of the Great Barrier Reef and you hear all about it, and you feel you have some understanding or knowledge about the reef, but until you actually go up there and see… Read More

Bob Brown is the founder of the Australian Green Party. He and his foundation have been fighting for decades to protect takayna / Tarkine. Photo: Krystle Wright

World Heritage Protection for the takayna / Tarkine

By Dr. Bob Brown   |   May 8, 2018 May 8, 2018

Nearly two centuries ago, Henry David Thoreau wrote that “In wildness is the preservation of the world.” I first went deep into the forests of northwestern Tasmania in 1973 in an unsuccessful search for the Tasmanian tiger. That wonderful creature is now accepted as extinct, but the takayna / Tarkine remains… Read More

Built in 1959, the Idbar Dam cracked soon after its construction. Investors and construction crews had ignored multiple warnings from the locals not to underestimate the force of the Bašćica, a river known to be unpredictable and fast-flowing. Idbar was decommissioned soon after it was constructed, when the river began fracturing the dam, allowing the Bašćica to flow freely again. Konjic, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Andrew Burr

Telling the Dam Truth

By Yvon Chouinard   |   Apr 9, 2018 April 9, 2018

Europe’s last remaining wild rivers are at grave risk. This time the danger isn’t coming from excessive drought or factories dumping toxic waste—it’s coming from the very hydropower dams that claim to bring us clean, green, renewable energy. The fact is, dams are dirty—and their destructive impact far outweighs their… Read More

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