The Cleanest Line

Climbing

This distant view of the Hummingbird Ridge shows the immensity of the climb, starting at the rocky cliffs at lower right to the summit three and a half miles away and some 13,000 feet higher. Photo: Roy Johnson Jr.

First Ascent of the Hummingbird Ridge (1965)

By Allen Steck   |   Nov 16, 2017 November 16, 2017

In honor of the release of A Mountaineer’s Life by Allen Steck, Patagonia Books is pleased to share this excerpt from chapter eight.  Camp II was a desperate and fearful place. We spent seven days there in severe weather. We could not leave the tents… Read More

Honoring Hayden

Honoring Hayden

By Yvon Chouinard   |   Oct 11, 2017 October 11, 2017

We are so sad to learn of the deaths of Hayden Kennedy and Inge Perkins. Malinda and I knew Hayden all his years. His parents, Michael and Julie Kennedy, are good friends who passed on to their son their love of climbing and skiing, and their ethics. The family also… Read More

Photo: Nadine Lehner

Paving the Brooks Range

By Nadine Lehner   |   Sep 19, 2017 September 19, 2017

“We were so hungry, we licked the margarine wrappers.” In the summer of 1975, my father and his two brothers loaded into an old truck and headed for Alaska, a fabled land for a teenage troupe of New England climbers. A mentor had shown them a faded photograph of the… Read More

Photo: Marko Prezelj

Spomin: The Memory Lessons

By Luka Krajnc   |   Aug 30, 2017 August 30, 2017

When I was ten years old, I was a hyperactive kid who had problems staying focused for a long period of time. One day I was sitting in class at primary school, listening to a subject that didn’t really interest me. Bored, I started playing with the scissors that I… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

The Dirtbag Diaries: 081

By Fitz Cahall   |   Aug 7, 2017 August 7, 2017

“Picture walking through a parking lot with a ski mask rolled up on your head and a pistol in your pocket. You’re getting closer to the bank, your heart’s beating faster, adrenaline’s starting to rush through your head, and you can’t believe you’re about to do what you’re about to… Read More

Photo: Peter Doucette

And Then There Were Two

By Majka Burhardt   |   Jul 25, 2017 July 25, 2017

Dear Kaz and Irenna, Today you are 10-months old. This week, the last of winter’s snow left our garden, and the final crocus patch bloomed and closed just in time to escape your attempts to eat its purple petals. I spent our first winter together pulling you behind me in… Read More

Photo: Logan Barber

Finding Peace

By Robbie Phillips   |   Jun 27, 2017 June 27, 2017

A sea of a thousand rocky thumbs. Which one do you take? Balancing trustingly on ten millimeters of rocky protrusion, your index finger wraps around the top of a feldspar knob. Don’t breathe too deeply or it might push you off. You have it, but you feel your balance waver. Read More

Photo: Mikey Schaefer

Begguya North Buttress Solo

By Colin Haley   |   Jun 1, 2017 June 1, 2017

I’ve just returned to Seattle from a trip to the Central Alaska Range, which was shorter than most with only two weeks of camping at Kahiltna Base Camp, but more successful than some Alaska Range trips I’ve done that were three times the length. In May 2012, I attempted to… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

The Dirtbag Diaries: Picaflor

By Fitz Cahall   |   May 30, 2017 May 30, 2017

When a bad breakup sent him spiraling into a deep depression, Tom Ireson fixated on an unconventional way to get his head straight. “I really needed something to focus my mind on to pull me out of that,” Tom says, “and about the biggest thing I could think of was to… Read More

Photo: Greg Cairns

Future

By Luke Mehall   |   May 24, 2017 May 24, 2017

As I write these words, the future of this place we humans now call Indian Creek is up in the balance. In December of 2016, President Obama designated Bears Ears—in which Indian Creek is located—a national monument under the Antiquities Act. But lawmakers are pushing to rescind this designation in… Read More

Photo: Jonathan Griffith

Ueli, We Miss You.

By Steve House   |   May 4, 2017 May 4, 2017

Like the rest of the world’s climbing community, we at Patagonia are deeply saddened by the death of renowned Swiss climber and mountaineer Ueli Steck on April 30, 2017, in Nepal. Below, alpinist Steve House remembers his friend. “There are dreams that are worth a certain amount… Read More

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