The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

“Whose planet? Our planet!” Read More

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Thousands took to the streets around the world during the global day of strike on March 15, 2019. In France, organizers counted more than 350,000 people who joined strikes across the country, with 45,000 people marching in Paris. In this photo, youth hold banners reading 'no nature, no future' during the strike in Paris. Photo by Thomas SAMSON/AFP/ Getty Images
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The confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado Rivers unites the past and present. It’s also the proposed site for a massive gondola. Photo: Peter McBride

Conserving Silence

By Kevin Fedarko & Peter McBride   |   Mar 6, 2019 March 6, 2019

As gorgeous as the Grand Canyon is to look upon, its greatest gifts may not be visual. “On any given evening in summer, but most notably in late June, there comes a moment just after the sun has disappeared behind the rimrock, and just before the darkness has tumbled down… Read More

Joseph Kibiwott and Jim Barngrover of Montana-based Timeless Seeds inspect the roots of a lentil plant for nodules that indicate nitrogen fixation, which helps the plant grow and fertilize soil. Photo: Amy Kumler

Farming Down

By Liz Carlisle   |   Mar 6, 2019 March 6, 2019

The promise of regenerative organic agriculture. “The problem is that we’re all taught to farm up,” David Oien says, leading me into a field of low-growing plants that I will later learn to recognize as lentils. I try to think of what alternative there might be to farming upward. Outward?… Read More

Photo: Barry & Cathy Beck

Home Pool, Sulphur Creek

By Peter Heller   |   Mar 4, 2019 March 4, 2019

When you lose your trout stream to climate change, where do you go to find yourself? It was late September and the creek ran clear and low out of the West Elks in southwestern Colorado. My favorite time of year: Through the V of the ravine upstream I could see… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Novel Inspiration

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Feb 15, 2019 February 15, 2019

After falling in love with John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, Charlie Turnbull and Leon Morton set out to recreate the 1,615-mile journey described in the novel – but on bikes. In July. With camera gear and a few buddies in tow, they followed historic Route 66 from Oklahoma to Southern… Read More

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A Facebook post incites an IRL response by the citizens of Mendoza, Argentina’s wine country. The protests led to 80,000 signatures in support of the draft bills to ban fracking—and seven anti-fracking draft laws before the Argentine congress. Photo: via EcoLeaks

The First Eco-Leak

By Christopher Ketcham   |   Feb 13, 2019 February 13, 2019

In March 2018, using nothing more than a Facebook page and a rudimentary website, a 33-year-old Argentine-American biologist named Esteban Servat launched a protest that has mobilized tens of thousands of people in Argentina. Servat published a secret Argentine government study of the environmental effects of fracking in the mountainous… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Mountain Hollow Dreams

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Feb 11, 2019 February 11, 2019

“I’d built it up in my head a lot—being a professional climber. This felt like the consummation of those dreams. I found the valley, I envisioned the trip, I got the funding, made it happen, stood at the base, picked the line, climbed it, sent, we were at the top… Read More

Honored by Grove, Manley and Oliver as “the Old Friend,” this 8- to 10-foot bristlecone stands ragged without the protection of other trees nearby, most of its roots above  ground. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: Trespassing

By Garrett Grove   |   Feb 6, 2019 February 6, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

This Cryptomeria corridor near the Togakushi Shrine in Nagano Prefecture pulls tree-seeking crowds 
 from Tokyo to walk through towering Japanese red-cedar, pay their respects to nature and ask for the protection of something in their lives. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: The Core

By Taro Tamai   |   Feb 5, 2019 February 5, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

Mars can wait. A sunset view of part of Massy’s farm, Severn Park, is a reminder that earthen beauty is a fringe benefit of regenerative agricultural practices. Photo: Trisha Dixon

A Blueprint for Cooling Earth

By Brad Wieners   |   Feb 4, 2019 February 4, 2019

When he was 22 and away at college, Charles Massy got a fateful shock: His father had suffered a severe heart attack, and while it wasn’t immediately fatal, it was clear his dad could no longer run the family farm back home in the Monaro region of New South Wales,… Read More

Microscope image shows a closer view of microfibers tested during the study. These tiny fibers that shed from garments over their lifetime are no larger than five millimeters. Photo: Mathew Watkins

Teaming Up to Get to the Bottom of Microfiber Pollution

By Stephen Chastain   |   Feb 1, 2019 February 1, 2019

Together with industry partners, Patagonia commissioned Ocean Wise’s Plastic Lab to investigate microfibers, the tiny textile particles that shed from garments over their lifetime. The scientists at the Plastic Lab have just completed the first phase of this research project, so we asked them for an update. While plastic debris… Read More

Leah Evans approaching a cedar “mother tree” at the bottom of the Womb, a slide path off Mount Macpherson near Revelstoke, British Columbia. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard has helped us understand that mother trees send nutrients to the surrounding forest, increasing the resilience of an entire network of trees. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: Homegrown

By Leah Evans   |   Jan 31, 2019 January 31, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

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