The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck Read More

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This Cryptomeria corridor near the Togakushi Shrine in Nagano Prefecture pulls tree-seeking crowds from Tokyo to walk through towering Japanese red-cedar, pay their respects to nature and ask for the protection of something in their lives. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove
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Jane Jackson tops out an unmanned V2 overlooking the year-round Canadian River. In the background are a few remaining Osage orange trees from the Mills Orchard Ranch. Photo: Eric Bissell

How Roy, New Mexico Became a World-Class Bouldering Area

By Eric Bissell   |   Sep 27, 2019 September 27, 2019

The patchwork history of public lands that transformed the area around a small New Mexico town into a world-class bouldering area We left the Mills Canyon Rim Campground, where we’d been living for three cold January weeks, just before dawn on our last morning in New Mexico. I pulled over… Read More

The volunteer team, made up of climbing rangers, Climber Stewards and volunteers, look at the massive pile of trash amassed from one of the many caches atop El Capitan. Photo: Eric Bissell

A Day at the Yosemite Facelift Cleanup

By Jane Jackson   |   Sep 25, 2019 September 25, 2019

On an incredibly clear, early autumn morning, the aging Yosemite Search and Rescue (YOSAR) van bumped along Tioga Pass Road, taking precariously tight turns at an alarming speed. Twelve of us were crammed in the back, chattering and bracing ourselves against the van’s interior walls. When the road was no… Read More

Look, but don’t touch—riding inside the caldera rim is off limits to human travel, due to safety and habitat preservation concerns. Here, Leah Evans and Kael Martin stand on the boundary of the no-go zone and mind surf lines into the lake. Photo: Colin Wiseman

Circumnavigating Crater Lake by Ski

By Colin Wiseman   |   Sep 20, 2019 September 20, 2019

Sampling the Offerings at Crater Lake “Go for Dirksen…” There was considerable static on my little two-way radio, but it was a small miracle we could hear Josh Dirksen at all. We hadn’t seen him since a dinner rendezvous two days prior in Bend. An agreed-upon… Read More

Lesser known than the First Divide and Third Divide trails, the Second Divide Trail isn’t part of the Downieville Classic courses—and thus remains somewhat of a secret gem for those looking to get away from the crowds. Chelsea Jolly traverses above the swimming pools and fall colors of Second Divide. Photo: Ken Etzel

Making Dirt Magic: Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship

By Sakeus Bankson   |   Sep 19, 2019 September 19, 2019

Greg Williams looks like a miner. Or a logger. Not the type you’d envision sitting in an enormous backhoe or lumber truck; with a black beard reaching halfway down his chest and an affinity for shovels, picks, Pulaskis and other tools of the dirt-moving trade, he would look as natural… Read More

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Much of what we sell is grown, and that’s why we’re investing in regenerative organic agriculture, a set of farming methods that conserves water, restores topsoil and removes carbon from the atmosphere. How much CO2 can “regen ag” really draw down? We’re finding out at family-owned cotton farms like the one where this photo was taken near Madhya Pradesh, India. Photo: Tim Davis

How We’re Reducing Our Carbon Footprint

By Patagonia   |   Sep 18, 2019 September 18, 2019

Ever since Patagonia had an office (and wasn’t just selling gear out of the back of Yvon’s car), we’ve devoted desk space, our free time and a percentage of our sales to protecting wild nature. From our travels, we knew our land, air and water was in real trouble from… Read More

To the barricades. A women’s march reached a police blockade on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, North Dakota, in 2016. The #NoDAPL protests focused on Indigenous rights but also the reckoning we’ll all face as the climate crisis intensifies: Do we defend oil companies—or fresh water? Photo: Colin McCarthy

The Climate Crisis Is a Human Issue

By Bill McKibben   |   Sep 16, 2019 September 16, 2019

Thirty years ago this month, I published my first book, The End of Nature, which was also the first book for a general audience about what we then called the greenhouse effect. And my main worry was about … nature. In 1989, global warming was still… Read More

Activists gathered in Turin, Italy this spring for a global day of strike demanding world leaders take bold action on the climate crisis. The demonstration is one of many organized by Fridays for Future, a movement of students who strike from school every Friday. Photo: Stefano Guidi/Getty Images

Why The Kids Are Striking

By Madalina Preda   |   Sep 11, 2019 September 11, 2019

There’s something undeniably cute about kids protesting. They paint their signs—and faces—in primary colors, add some glitter. They smile and laugh as they huddle for selfies. Yet if they seem playful, they’re also serious. The millions of young people who’ve taken to the streets in the last year know that… Read More

Pristine tributaries of the Chilkat River are threatened by the Palmer Project because sulfide mines produce toxic sludge that must be kept out of waterways to avoid devastating the ecosystem. Photo: Connor Gallagher

The Chilkat’s Fight Against the Palmer Project

By Tim Gibbins   |   Sep 5, 2019 September 5, 2019

Klukwan is a village of 90 people in Southeast Alaska that’s home to the Chilkat Indian Village, a federally recognized tribe, on the banks of the Chilkat River 22 miles north of Haines, Alaska. The Chilkat have lived in the Chilkat Valley for over 2,000 years. It’s a land of… Read More

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