The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck Read More

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This Cryptomeria corridor near the Togakushi Shrine in Nagano Prefecture pulls tree-seeking crowds from Tokyo to walk through towering Japanese red-cedar, pay their respects to nature and ask for the protection of something in their lives. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove
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Five-thirty a.m. looking good from my tent the second morning of GoWild 2018. Photo: Kirsten Van Horne

How One Teenager Is Addressing the Climate Crisis

By Kirsten Van Horne   |   Jul 17, 2019 July 17, 2019

 In our 1990 summer catalog we said, “It’s up to us to make sure that children don’t go tree hungry, that they have wild places and opportunities to be in them. Once they do, they will amaze us with their caring. They need not wait to grow up to be… Read More

The first wildlife overpass put in on the People’s Way Partnership project along Highway 93 in Montana. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes declared that the highway was a visitor on the landscape and any future improvements needed to consider the need of wildlife first. In this spirit, the tribes worked closely with the Montana Department of Transportation and created the densest collection of wildlife crossing structures in North America. Bears, deer, elk, bobcats and others are already using the structures. Photo: Steven Gnam

Senator Tom Udall on the Hope of Wildlife Corridors

By Senator Tom Udall   |   Jul 16, 2019 July 16, 2019

As the great Aldo Leopold once said, harmony with the land and with wildlife “is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left.” Yet here we are: humankind is now the singular driving force behind the potential extinction of more than one… Read More

The last straw. Meredith Wiltsie wiring the damn muffler en route to the Ruby Mountains, Nevada. Photo: Gordon Wiltsie

What a Road Trip Breakdown Has to Do with Mars

By Bonnie Tsui   |   Jul 15, 2019 July 15, 2019

Rule #1 of a road trip: Vehicle may break down. Rule #2 of a road trip: You may break down along with it. Near the Ruby Mountains in Nevada, Gordon and Meredith Wiltsie were struggling with wrenches and wire after the muffler came loose on their old International Travelall. As… Read More

Photo Courtesy Dave Murray

The Long, Happy March of Barefoot Dave

By Doug Chadwick   |   Jul 12, 2019 July 12, 2019

Dave Murray lives in a wooded mountain valley in western Montana with his wife, Connie; a labradoodle rightly named Loki, after the Norse god of mischief; and a bunch of mules. I live 140 miles north near Glacier National Park. He and I met on a float trip down a… Read More

Built in 1959, the Idbar Dam cracked soon after its construction. Investors and construction crews had ignored multiple warnings from the locals not to underestimate the force of the Bašćica, a river known to be unpredictable and fast-flowing. Idbar was decommissioned soon after it was constructed, when the river began fracturing the dam, allowing the Bašćica to flow freely again. Konjic, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Andrew Burr

One Year for the Blue Heart of Europe

By Lisa Rose   |   Jun 20, 2019 June 20, 2019

The Vjosa River flows 270 kilometers without barriers from the Pindus Mountains to the Adriatic Sea. It’s one of many rivers in the Balkans that are under threat by a tidal wave of more than 2,800 new hydropower dam projects. In March 2018, Patagonia joined grassroots groups and regional community… Read More

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Photo: Will Strathmann

Kitty Calhoun on Paradox Sports

By Kitty Calhoun   |   Jul 12, 2019 July 12, 2019

As I labored under the weight of a heavy pack and took my turn breaking trail in the soft snow in the quest to establish a new route on a Himalayan peak, I was also mired in self-doubt. I was with three men who were much stronger than me, and… Read More

When you've got free-running rivers and an abundance of alpine trails, there isn't much time to kick back. But on the lazier days, the 13th Avenue Book Box is how Smithers, B.C. keeps on reading. Photo: Malcolm Johnson

The Books in the Patagonia Team’s Bags

By Patagonia   |   Jul 5, 2019 July 5, 2019

If your idea of a great summer read is, like a day in the waves, a little escape from it all, this post may not be right for you. Maybe there’s just no escaping the severity of the climate crisis, or maybe we’re just so glad to have time to… Read More

Instead of feeding on whitebark pine nuts and army cutworm moths in the alpine country, grizzlies are beginning to stay low in Montana’s Mission Valley throughout summer and into fall gorging themselves on the abundant crops planted at the base of the mountains. Courtesy Bryce Andrews

Grizzlies, Corn, and the Urgency of Protecting Wildlife Corridors

By Bryce Andrews   |   Jul 3, 2019 July 3, 2019

This was the rule of late summer in Montana’s Mission Valley: During the day, the landscape belonged to humans. Tractors worked the fields, and children played carefree in the yards. People swam in shady eddies and picnicked beside the creeks. At night, the bears came out. Stretching in the cooling… Read More

In front of a jump-off rock aptly named Life and Death, Dan Ross puts a new 5'9

A Conversation with Surfboard Designer Fletcher Chouinard

By Sean Doherty   |   Jun 24, 2019 June 24, 2019

At Fletcher Chouinard Designs, the focus is on durable, high-performing equipment that lets you have fun no matter what the ocean is doing. There are never enough hours in a day for Fletcher Chouinard. As a surfer, shaper, kiteboarder and new father, he was really doing the dance. Then along… Read More

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