The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck Read More

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This Cryptomeria corridor near the Togakushi Shrine in Nagano Prefecture pulls tree-seeking crowds from Tokyo to walk through towering Japanese red-cedar, pay their respects to nature and ask for the protection of something in their lives. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove
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After months of restoration work, the 45-foot canoe U’i undergoes precise measurement during the waterline test that confirmed she was ready to race once more. Ke’ehi Lagoon, Hawai’i. Photo: John Bilderback

Restoring a Traditional Hawaiian Koa Canoe on O’ahu

By Ben Wilkinson   |   Jun 17, 2019 June 17, 2019

Restoring a traditional Hawaiian koa canoe. Ka Wahine u‘i O Hale‘iwa, which roughly translates to “Beautiful Young Woman of Hale‘iwa,” is the pride and joy of the Manu O Ke Kai Canoe Club here in Hale‘iwa on the North Shore of O‘ahu. Carved from a single koa tree, U‘i’s life… Read More

The US recycling collection rate for plastic bottles is less than 30 percent. These bottles are among the lucky few that made it to a recycling facility to be melted down and turned into recycled polyester gear. This fall season, 69% of Patagonia’s line, by weight, will be derived from recycled materials. Photo: Lloyd Belcher

What We’re Doing About Our Plastic Problem

By Patagonia   |   Jun 13, 2019 June 13, 2019

Our home planet has a deeply disturbing and pervasive problem with plastics. In April, a group of researchers studying the deepest part of the ocean—the Mariana Trench—discovered plastic bags and candy wrappers floating nearly seven miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean. Globally, about 450 million metric tons of plastic are produced every… Read More

Built in 1959, the Idbar Dam cracked soon after its construction. Investors and construction crews had ignored multiple warnings from the locals not to underestimate the force of the Bašćica, a river known to be unpredictable and fast-flowing. Idbar was decommissioned soon after it was constructed, when the river began fracturing the dam, allowing the Bašćica to flow freely again. Konjic, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Andrew Burr

One Year for the Blue Heart of Europe

By Lisa Rose   |   Jun 20, 2019 June 20, 2019

The Vjosa River flows 270 kilometers without barriers from the Pindus Mountains to the Adriatic Sea. It’s one of many rivers in the Balkans that are under threat by a tidal wave of more than 2,800 new hydropower dam projects. In March 2018, Patagonia joined grassroots groups and regional community… Read More

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Anne Gilbert Chase and Brittany Griffith get the beta on Alam Kuh from Iranian climbers Habibi and Sholmaz, friends and partners from Tabriz. During our time at base camp, we got to know Habibi, Sholmaz and many other Iranian climbers, who would come by our camp to welcome us to Iran and the Alborz Mountains, and to talk about climbing, life and politics. We were a fascinating anomaly, but being climbers made us break that down. Photo: Beth Wald

Finding Refuge in Iran’s Climbing Culture

By Beth Wald   |   May 29, 2019 May 29, 2019

Fog from the distant Caspian Sea swirled around us as we left the road, crossed a narrow mountain stream on a rickety footbridge of wornwooden planks, passed a pungent corral full of dank, scruffy sheep, and started the steep climb to Alam Kuh base camp in the Alborz mountain range… Read More

Spring time in the Sierra. Photo: Christian Pondella

The Sierra Snow Wolf: Snowboarder Nick Russell

By Max Hammer   |   May 24, 2019 May 24, 2019

On the west face of Mount Whitney, just off the summit of the highest peak in the lower 48, we had to traverse right. For us skiers it was no real issue, a bit of sidestepping and poling would do the trick. Yet, our group was comprised of both two… Read More

Growing hemp is easy. This fibrous plant needs no pesticides or irrigation and requires low quantities of fertilizer. But turning hemp into fabric is a complicated task that requires an expertise American farmers will need to regain. Photo: Lloyd Belcher

Hemp Is Back: How Some of Ours Is Produced, in Photos

By Diane French   |   May 1, 2019 May 1, 2019

It’s hard not to notice the hype around hemp today. Pick up any lifestyle magazine, enter a pharmacy, talk to a health-food store employee or just the person next to you in yoga class—at some point you’ll learn about its miraculous powers. In particular, near-unbelievable claims swirl around cannabidiol, or… Read More

A wild female Chinook salmon surges upstream toward the spawning grounds. Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Photo: Eiko Jones

What’s a Fish Eater to Do? Chef Ken Davis Has Some Ideas

By Langdon Cook   |   Apr 24, 2019 April 24, 2019

When Kevin Davis was a kid growing up in southeast Louisiana, recycling meant filling the pickup with trash and driving down to the river to dump it. Just the same, he and his neighbors had a reverence for the wild. “We prided ourselves on being hunter-gatherers,” he says. He’d bring… Read More

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