The Cleanest Line

Snow

Ryland Bell hikes to the top of a glacier in northwestern British Columbia under fast-moving clouds. After a short wait in a whiteout, the skies cleared somewhat, and he was able to drop into wide open powder turns. Photo: Colin Wiseman

Ryland Bell’s Chilkat Hideaway

By Colin Wiseman   |   Jan 21, 2020 January 21, 2020

Predawn on April 4, 2019. There’s hardly any snow in the mountains. Worst year in recent history, the locals are saying. We’re loading boxes of food onto the ferry, preparing to board the Alaska Marine Highway from Juneau to Haines. “It’s southeast Alaska, you never know,”… Read More

During a mountain gourmet lunch stop—meat, cheese, week-old bagels and stone-ground mustard—Nan Cresto, her daughter Sailor Kabeary, Roan Harvey and Cheryl Albrecht-Harvey recharge after a morning of multiple low-angle powder laps during a rest day outing above the Peyto Hut.   Photo: Kennan Harvey

Ski-Touring Banff National Park with Two Teen Daughters

By Kennan Harvey   |   Nov 5, 2019 November 5, 2019

A group of four skiers moves methodically across the snow-covered Wapta Icefield ahead of me in single file connected by a thread-like rope—mothers on each end, Cheryl and Nan, and their two daughters, Roan and Sailor, in the middle. As Roan’s father and Cheryl’s husband, I’m tagging along on this… Read More

It’s hard to believe that this is Arizona. Len Necefer navigates the blowing snow and rocks along the summit ridge of Dook’o’sliid, the peak that never melts, amidst gale force winds and frigid temperatures. Photo: Greg Balkin

The Summit Which Never Melts: Dookʼoʼoosłííd

By Len Necefer   |   Oct 25, 2019 October 25, 2019

Snow and icy rime break from the porous black volcanic ridgeline crackling beneath my feet. Gale-force updrafts from the gullied ridges below whip the skis and splitboards strapped to our backs. Each gust forces us to step toward the cornice that hangs above the caldera to our right. The temperature… Read More

Katrina Van Wijk punches through thin ice while trying to make it to the middle of the river. Photo: Jasper Gibson

Paddling, Suffering, and Skiing from BC to Wrangell, Alaska

By Jasper Gibson   |   Oct 2, 2019 October 2, 2019

The rumble of the diesel engine fades out of earshot, giving way to our new solitude: Just us, the frozen river, our kayaks (fully loaded with ski mountaineering gear, camping supplies, rations for five people and all the needed accoutrement for 18 days in the Boundary Range) and hundreds upon… Read More

Look, but don’t touch—riding inside the caldera rim is off limits to human travel, due to safety and habitat preservation concerns. Here, Leah Evans and Kael Martin stand on the boundary of the no-go zone and mind surf lines into the lake. Photo: Colin Wiseman

Circumnavigating Crater Lake by Ski

By Colin Wiseman   |   Sep 20, 2019 September 20, 2019

Sampling the Offerings at Crater Lake “Go for Dirksen…” There was considerable static on my little two-way radio, but it was a small miracle we could hear Josh Dirksen at all. We hadn’t seen him since a dinner rendezvous two days prior in Bend. An agreed-upon… Read More

Spring time in the Sierra. Photo: Christian Pondella

The Sierra Snow Wolf: Snowboarder Nick Russell

By Max Hammer   |   May 24, 2019 May 24, 2019

On the west face of Mount Whitney, just off the summit of the highest peak in the lower 48, we had to traverse right. For us skiers it was no real issue, a bit of sidestepping and poling would do the trick. Yet, our group was comprised of both two… Read More

Honored by Grove, Manley and Oliver as “the Old Friend,” this 8- to 10-foot bristlecone stands ragged without the protection of other trees nearby, most of its roots above  ground. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: Trespassing

By Garrett Grove   |   Feb 6, 2019 February 6, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

This Cryptomeria corridor near the Togakushi Shrine in Nagano Prefecture pulls tree-seeking crowds 
 from Tokyo to walk through towering Japanese red-cedar, pay their respects to nature and ask for the protection of something in their lives. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: The Core

By Taro Tamai   |   Feb 5, 2019 February 5, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

Leah Evans approaching a cedar “mother tree” at the bottom of the Womb, a slide path off Mount Macpherson near Revelstoke, British Columbia. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard has helped us understand that mother trees send nutrients to the surrounding forest, increasing the resilience of an entire network of trees. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: Homegrown

By Leah Evans   |   Jan 31, 2019 January 31, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

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