Charge It with Sugar Batteries

1 Min Read

BattsThough it’s not the first battery to run on sugar, researchers at St. Louis University have developed a more efficient version that could last three to four times longer than conventional lithium ion batteries — a boon for personal electronic devices. The icing on the cake: these new batteries are built completely from biodegradable materials. Let’s hope for a rechargeable version so we don’t have to test the biodegradability until absolutely necessary.

Coincidentally, the key part of the battery, a charge-stripping enzyme, is incorporated into a membrane that’s made from chitosan — the same compound that makes up Patagonia’s Gladiodor natural odor control in our Capilene Baselayers.

Read the full story

[Via Google News and LiveScience; Photo: Batteries awaiting recycling. By: Free]

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