“The Super Salmon:” A Film About One Tenacious Fish

Ryan Peterson  /  2 Min Read  /  Activism

The Super Salmon is an intimate and inspiring look into the impacts of the proposed Susitna-Watana dam on the Susitna River in south-central Alaska. The story outlines the threats posed by the Susitna Dam and the work of the Susitna River Coalition, which is aimed at protecting our free-flowing, healthy watershed so that future generations of salmon, wildlife, and humans can depend on it as we do today. Photo courtesy of Susitna River Coalition

It is with great pride and excitement that we are sharing The Super Salmon with the world—a little movie about the Su and the spotlight it’s been in these last few years. From the first screening in Talkeetna a year ago, to the dozens more that have followed across Alaska, the Lower 48, Canada, and even Europe, it has been a joy to see thousands of people so readily relate not only to our river in all its glory, but to the incredible and effective work the Susitna River Coalition (SRC) does on behalf of present and future generations.

We stopped a dam the other day in Alaska, on the Susitna River. We gave a grant of twenty-five thousand dollars to a filmmaker who was making a film called The Super Salmon. The film comes out, the guy shows it around, and the governor, just like that, he kills the dam. You don’t get many clear-cut victories like that. But sometimes all it takes is one person.

—Yvon Chouinard, The New Yorker, September 19, 2016

It has been a great honor to be entrusted to tell this story, and if I have learned anything in getting to know so many people so intimately, and seeing the fruits of their work and convictions pay off in so many ways, it is this: If you want to change the world, grassroots movements are kinda the only things that do it. And that is more true today than ever.

If you enjoy this film and are inspired to do more, please donate. Your donations go directly to SRC programs that work toward long-term protections to ensure a wild and free Susitna River long into the future.

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