The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

Exploring the connection between humans and our oldest living companions — trees. Read More

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Alex Yoder rides the line in a secret spot outside Niseko. Hokkaido, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove
Tongass National Forest, Alaska. Photo: Amy Gulick

The Shutdown Isn’t Over

By Elliott Woods   |   Mar 15, 2019 March 15, 2019

For 34 days in December and January, the government shutdown not only impaired the livelihoods of 800,000 federal employees, it brought almost the entire federal scientific apparatus to a halt. Worse, there are indicators that the Trump administration willingly took advantage of the shutdown to expedite strategic projects in the… Read More

Thousands of domesticated hatchery salmon are released into the San Francisco Bay. photo: Ben Moon

The Best Hatchery Is a Healthy River

By Dylan Tomine   |   Mar 14, 2019 March 14, 2019

We are killing what we love. The vast system of hatcheries and open-water fish farms we’ve built is an expression of our affection for cold-water fish—as food, as recreation, as commercial resource. And yet, despite our best intentions, these human-engineered attempts to make up for resource extraction, development and dam… Read More

In business to save our home planet, Patagonia owner/founder Yvon Chouinard. Photo: Jimmy Chin

What’s at Stake Is the Future of Humankind

By Patagonia   |   Mar 14, 2019 March 14, 2019

“Forget Mars,” Yvon Chouinard said recently—although, come to think of it, he might have used a stronger f-word. Our founder was responding to a glib idea that comes up from time to time in conversations about the climate crisis—that if we exhaust the Earth as a habitat for humans, we’ll… Read More

Alexandria started striking against climate inaction on December 14, 2018. She was inspired by Greta Thunberg’s Friday protests in front of the Swedish Parliament. She usually sits on this bench nearby the UN Headquarters in New York City with her two signs. “Most people pass me by, but some stop and ask me to tell them about my signs. One Swedish girl saw me one day and said she knew Greta and the student strike movement. We took a photo and she cried.” Photo: Joel Caldwell

Adults, Change Is Coming Whether You Like It or Not

By Alexandria Villaseñor   |   Mar 11, 2019 March 11, 2019

Alexandria Villaseñor is a 13-year-old climate justice activist and one of three lead organizers, together with Isra Hirsi and Haven Coleman, of US Youth Climate Strike. She is part of a global movement of students who are striking from school to protest inaction on climate change. The global… Read More

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Was Meñakoz a legitimate big-wave spot? Photo: Tony Butt collection

An Englishman in Euskadi

By Tony Butt   |   Mar 11, 2019 March 11, 2019

It was November 1991. I was with two friends and we were at the beginning of a three-month surf trip around the coasts of Spain and Portugal. Mundaka was our starting point. We all agreed that we would be happy just to get something better than the cold, windblown beach… Read More

Some wilderness is wilder than others. According to the U.S. Forest Service, “The Bob” has a higher density of grizzly bears than anywhere in the country outside of Alaska. Wolves, mountain lions and other large mammals also call it home—a fact that might put a spring in one’s step while running some of the 1,800+ miles of remote, foot-and stock-only trails. Bob Marshall Wilderness Area, Montana. Photo: Steven Gnam

Measure of Time

By Meaghen Brown   |   Mar 7, 2019 March 7, 2019

For the slo-mo, bug-bitten, exhausted joy of really long runs. Time expands and compresses on long runs. Moments of navigation or extended discomfort can seem endless, while the landscape sifts by like a slow-moving picture. And then suddenly it’s been hours that slipped by without you noticing, except for… Read More

The confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado Rivers unites the past and present. It’s also the proposed site for a massive gondola. Photo: Peter McBride

Conserving Silence

By Kevin Fedarko & Peter McBride   |   Mar 6, 2019 March 6, 2019

As gorgeous as the Grand Canyon is to look upon, its greatest gifts may not be visual. “On any given evening in summer, but most notably in late June, there comes a moment just after the sun has disappeared behind the rimrock, and just before the darkness has tumbled down… Read More

Joseph Kibiwott and Jim Barngrover of Montana-based Timeless Seeds inspect the roots of a lentil plant for nodules that indicate nitrogen fixation, which helps the plant grow and fertilize soil. Photo: Amy Kumler

Farming Down

By Liz Carlisle   |   Mar 6, 2019 March 6, 2019

The promise of regenerative organic agriculture. “The problem is that we’re all taught to farm up,” David Oien says, leading me into a field of low-growing plants that I will later learn to recognize as lentils. I try to think of what alternative there might be to farming upward. Outward?… Read More

Photo: Barry & Cathy Beck

Home Pool, Sulphur Creek

By Peter Heller   |   Mar 4, 2019 March 4, 2019

When you lose your trout stream to climate change, where do you go to find yourself? It was late September and the creek ran clear and low out of the West Elks in southwestern Colorado. My favorite time of year: Through the V of the ravine upstream I could see… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Novel Inspiration

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Feb 15, 2019 February 15, 2019

After falling in love with John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, Charlie Turnbull and Leon Morton set out to recreate the 1,615-mile journey described in the novel – but on bikes. In July. With camera gear and a few buddies in tow, they followed historic Route 66 from Oklahoma to Southern… Read More

A Facebook post incites an IRL response by the citizens of Mendoza, Argentina’s wine country. The protests led to 80,000 signatures in support of the draft bills to ban fracking—and seven anti-fracking draft laws before the Argentine congress. Photo: via EcoLeaks

The First Eco-Leak

By Christopher Ketcham   |   Feb 13, 2019 February 13, 2019

In March 2018, using nothing more than a Facebook page and a rudimentary website, a 33-year-old Argentine-American biologist named Esteban Servat launched a protest that has mobilized tens of thousands of people in Argentina. Servat published a secret Argentine government study of the environmental effects of fracking in the mountainous… Read More

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