The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

“Endless pressure, endlessly applied.” Read More
Tens of thousands protest the Trump administration’s assault on the environment at the People’s Climate March in Washington, D.C. Photo: Astrid Riecken
Chris Shalbot races the weather above Big Hole Pass as foreboding clouds gather in the distance. Photo: Scott Rinckenberger

The Fun/Suffer Divide

By Chris Shalbot   |   Mar 20, 2018 March 20, 2018

The Continental Divide Trail is not often traveled, and rarely by bike. The sheer remoteness makes access tricky. With this in mind, Scott Rinckenberger, Justin Olsen and I set out for 11 days on our bikes, pedaling northeast from Chief Joseph Pass. We wanted to shed some light on this… Read More

After hard crimping right off the glacier, Kate Rutherford sinks her fingers into the climbing above. Pointe Adolphe Rey, Chamonix, France. Photo: Bernd Zeugswetter

Sometimes More Than a Game

By Kelly Cordes   |   Mar 19, 2018 March 19, 2018

When I think about climbing, I don’t think about summits. I see serrated ridgelines rising and falling between earth and sky, and sunlight slipping between spires, casting the shadows of giants onto rubble-strewn rivers of ice below, curving, moving, bending with the passage of time. I remember my partners and… Read More

Maddy Butcher ponies two horses and rides another in southwestern Colorado. Photo: Beau Gaughran

Beasts of Being

By Maddy Butcher   |   Mar 15, 2018 March 15, 2018

Some 5,500 years ago in Kazakhstan, there was light bulb moment when man looked at equus caballus and thought, “Hey, I can ride that thing.” Since then, we’ve fought wars and built worlds on horses’ backs. Fast forward to the beginning of the 20th century; Americans have 20 million horses. Read More

Mike Wood is the co-founder of Su Salmon Co. and the volunteer president of the Susitna River Coalition. Photo: Travis Rummel

Net to Table: Su Salmon Co.

By Ryan Peterson   |   Mar 13, 2018 March 13, 2018

Mike Wood’s last name is a wholly appropriate coincidence of birth. He’s got a fetish for the stuff. When building his off-the-grid log home masterpiece on the banks of Alaska’s Susitna River, he’d range out into the surrounding boreal forest, select each perfect tree, hug it at the chest in… Read More

Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, aka Kid Warrior, is a climate activist, a hip-hop artist and the Youth Director of Earth Guardians. Photo: Earth Guardians

The Year of Youth

By Cora Neumann   |   Mar 9, 2018 March 9, 2018

This February, Patagonia announced the launch of Patagonia Action Works to a packed house in Santa Monica, California. It isn’t easy to pack a house in Los Angeles, with the traffic and long distances many people have to travel on a busy Friday night. But… Read More

Ansil Saunders points to the mangrove island, still visible today, where the all-tackle world-record bonefish was landed. Photo: Brian Irwin

When the Mountaintop Met the Mangroves

By Brian Irwin   |   Mar 8, 2018 March 8, 2018

“It happened right there—just off that mangrove island,” Ansil Saunders points, recollecting the day in 1971 that his client, Jerry Lavenstein, a now-deceased sportsman from Virginia Beach, Virginia, caught a 16-pound bonefish on eight-pound test and a live shrimp. That fish was an all-tackle world record, one that still stands. Read More

Activists have been fighting against the construction of the Kaminoseki nuclear power plant for 35 years. Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. Photo: Keiko Nasu

Sea of Miracles

By Patagonia   |   Feb 28, 2018 February 28, 2018

“After dinner, the round-faced, quirky old professor pulled his necklace out of his shirt,” says Sea of Miracles director, Dan Malloy. “It was a small clay flute shaped like a football. He announced that he would be performing an old Japanese protest song. The room went silent. He… Read More

Patagonia material developer Kristin Umscheid studies PlumaFill’s potential at the Patagonia headquarters in Ventura, California. Photo: Kyle Sparks

It All Adds Up to Nothing: Forging The Micro Puff

By Patagonia   |   Feb 27, 2018 February 27, 2018

At Patagonia, our best ideas come from being in the field. But sometimes simple problems inspire complex solutions. That’s been the case with the development of insulation. Down gets wet and loses its heat-trapping loft, and synthetics never quite achieve the same warmth, lightness or compressibility as down plumes. We’ve… Read More

Grandson Braden steered the longest crossing of the 2017 trip, from O‘ahu to Kaua‘i. Photo: ©Holopuni Va‘a, by Wim Lippens

A Thirty-Five-Year Voyage Back In Time

By Nick Beck   |   Feb 23, 2018 February 23, 2018

In May 1981, I set out in a home-built Hawaiian sailing canoe from South Point on the island of Hawai‘i to my home on Kaua‘i. It was an adventure that would take me from the southern-most to the northern-most point of the Hawaiian Islands. I named my canoe Holopuni, “to… Read More

Kyle Thiermann and Greg Long load up pieces of boat wreckage at Isla De Todos Santos. Baja California, Mexico. Photo: Nikki Brooks

Fiberglass Forearms

By Kyle Thiermann   |   Feb 15, 2018 February 15, 2018

Besides a lighthouse, a dirt trail and a few small structures, Isla De Todos Santos is almost completely undeveloped. The only permanent resident is the lighthouse keeper, who greeted us in Spanish as we approached after stepping ashore on a bright October morning. Those who choose to live in… Read More