The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

“It was an experience I’ll never forget, and you don’t get a whole lot of those in your life.” Read More

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Emma Sant kites over the silica sands of Whitsunday Island, just west of the Great Barrier Reef. Photo: Jarrah Lynch
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I am not sure I would be on this path to brain surgery had I never chosen to take up paddling, and eventually used it as a tool to raise awareness about the silent disease. Photo: Luke Williams

Paddling with a Purpose

By Jared Muscat   |   Apr 12, 2018 April 12, 2018

Last year I decided to truly dig in to my effort to raise awareness about epilepsy, a disease that affects 1 out of every 26 people in the United States, by using my social media and long-distance paddling skills. I worked hard to prepare for a 17-mile paddle, reached out… Read More

The first few inches of the 16 we left behind on our way to Sun Valley. Photo: Kern Ducote

Better Than We Knew

By Kern Ducote   |   Apr 5, 2018 April 5, 2018

After 48 days in the same vehicle with the same four people, five if you count Brandon’s second shadow and beloved dog Rudy (half dog, half human), one is ready for a week of weekends. We romped around for the better part of the last two months, running from Squaw… Read More

La Caldera: big, windy and empty. Photo: Miguel Arribazalaga, 2013

The Paradox of Schrödinger’s Peak

By Tony Butt   |   Apr 3, 2018 April 3, 2018

It was about an hour before dark. The spot had been a lot easier to find than I thought—five minutes from the main road and within easy viewing distance from a cliff. A few weeks earlier a friend had told me he had seen “something breaking” along this stretch of… Read More

It Was Always About Oil, Coal, Gas and Uranium

It Was Always About Oil, Coal, Gas and Uranium

By Lisa Pike Sheehy   |   Mar 29, 2018 March 29, 2018

In December of 2017, the president illegally reduced Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments by nearly two million acres. Despite overwhelming support from the majority of Americans, nearly three million of whom spoke up during a public comment period in favor of protecting our national monuments,… Read More

Built in 1959, the Idbar Dam cracked soon after its construction. Investors and construction crews had ignored multiple warnings from the locals not to underestimate the force of the Bašćica, a river known to be unpredictable and fast-flowing. Idbar was decommissioned soon after it was constructed, when the river began fracturing the dam, allowing the Bašćica to flow freely again. Konjic, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Andrew Burr

Telling the Dam Truth

By Yvon Chouinard   |   Apr 9, 2018 April 9, 2018

Europe’s last remaining wild rivers are at grave risk. This time the danger isn’t coming from excessive drought or factories dumping toxic waste—it’s coming from the very hydropower dams that claim to bring us clean, green, renewable energy. The fact is, dams are dirty—and their destructive impact far outweighs their… Read More

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Caught by the heavy winds of a fast-moving South Pacific squall, Liz Clark heads to the mast to put another reef in Swell’s sail. Photo: Tahui Tufaimea

High Voltage

By Liz Clark   |   Mar 26, 2018 March 26, 2018

After an hour’s sleep, I wake to the sound of fat raindrops pelting the deck. The noise quickly escalates into a deafening torrent, and I push up off the settee and climb up the steps. Glancing at the radar screen on my way up, I see a massive squall blacking… Read More

Artwork: Walker Cahall

Escape from Beacon Rock

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Mar 23, 2018 March 23, 2018

“For me, it was a way to stay connected, literally: tied to my free-range daughter by a length of 10-millimeter climbing rope, and connected to my own dream of being an adventurer,” says David Altschul. “And that was how I found myself, a few days later, on a ledge, high… Read More

Chris Shalbot races the weather above Big Hole Pass as foreboding clouds gather in the distance. Photo: Scott Rinckenberger

The Fun/Suffer Divide

By Chris Shalbot   |   Mar 20, 2018 March 20, 2018

The Continental Divide Trail is not often traveled, and rarely by bike. The sheer remoteness makes access tricky. With this in mind, Scott Rinckenberger, Justin Olsen and I set out for 11 days on our bikes, pedaling northeast from Chief Joseph Pass. We wanted to shed some light on this… Read More

After hard crimping right off the glacier, Kate Rutherford sinks her fingers into the climbing above. Pointe Adolphe Rey, Chamonix, France. Photo: Bernd Zeugswetter

Sometimes More Than a Game

By Kelly Cordes   |   Mar 19, 2018 March 19, 2018

When I think about climbing, I don’t think about summits. I see serrated ridgelines rising and falling between earth and sky, and sunlight slipping between spires, casting the shadows of giants onto rubble-strewn rivers of ice below, curving, moving, bending with the passage of time. I remember my partners and… Read More

Maddy Butcher ponies two horses and rides another in southwestern Colorado. Photo: Beau Gaughran

Beasts of Being

By Maddy Butcher   |   Mar 15, 2018 March 15, 2018

Some 5,500 years ago in Kazakhstan, there was light bulb moment when man looked at Equus caballus and thought, “Hey, I can ride that thing.” Since then, we’ve fought wars and built worlds on horses’ backs. Fast forward to the beginning of the 20th century; Americans have 20 million horses. Read More

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