The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

“Endless pressure, endlessly applied.” Read More
Tens of thousands protest the Trump administration’s assault on the environment at the People’s Climate March in Washington, D.C. Photo: Astrid Riecken
Sean Villanueva O’Driscoll works a tricky dihedral on the first ascent of El Regalo de Mwono in Torres del Paine, Patagonia. Photo: Nicolas Favresse

Unstuck in Baffin Island’s Stewart Valley

By Nico Favresse   |   Jan 12, 2018 January 12, 2018

Pain pulses in my right foot to the rhythm of my heartbeats. I know something’s wrong, but the only option is to ignore it. The swelling presses against my shoe, but I’m afraid if I take it off, I’ll never get it back on. Still, I feel like I can’t… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Growing Down

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Jan 2, 2018 January 2, 2018

I’ve watched my friends and peers hopscotch across the world. Some of them have reached the top of their craft, authored ridiculous lines up mountains, followed rivers into wrinkles of the deepest canyons, found the edge of human endurance. If I look back on the last ten years, I’m often… Read More

Members of the Porcupine caribou herd crossing the Hulahula River in the Arctic Refuge. Caribou travel in groups and migrate at different times: Pregnant females, some yearlings and barren cows are the first to travel north toward the coastal plain, followed by males and the rest of the juveniles. Photo: Florian Schulz

The Fight to Protect the Arctic Refuge Has Just Begun

By Patagonia   |   Dec 27, 2017 December 27, 2017

“Americans have voiced overwhelming support for protecting the Arctic Refuge, and the fight is far from over. If we destroy the Arctic Refuge today, we will never get that wild, unspoiled wilderness back.” —Rose Marcario, President and CEO of Patagonia On December 20, Congress passed the tax bill… Read More

The White Nile River, a tributary of the Nile, flows through Uganda. Photo: Eli Reichman

A Displaced Spirit

By Chandra Brown   |   Dec 21, 2017 December 21, 2017

When the Bujagali dam was erected on Uganda’s White Nile in 2011, the World Bank hired local witch doctors to relocate the river’s spirit gods. The deities that dwell in the Nile’s massive rapids were moved to cataracts on different, unaffected stretches of the river. This struck me as remarkable:… Read More

Eric Pollard picks a nice spot to chill. Virginia Lakes, California. Photo: Andrew Miller

The Last Hill

By Max Hammer   |   Dec 20, 2017 December 20, 2017

We were off-the-couch bikers, versed in miles per hour, not miles per day. After seven days of biking to ski, we needed a rest day. Hot springs mandatory. We remembered a shortcut to the Green Church pools, which was 9 miles shorter than the highway route. Shortcuts—with deeply rutted, washboard… Read More

View from Bluff, Utah, of Cottonwood Wash which was part of the original Bears Ears National Monument, but is now outside of protection. This area is now a target for energy development. Photo: Josh Ewing

Response to the House Committee on Natural Resources

By Yvon Chouinard   |   Dec 19, 2017 December 19, 2017

December 19, 2017 Rob Bishop Chairman U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources 1324 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Dear Chairman Bishop and the House Committee on Natural Resources, I find it disingenuous that after unethically using taxpayers’ resources… Read More

Students from Patagonia, Chile, and the Klamath River Basin form long-lasting bonds while confronting the challenges and joys of paddling 120 miles of the Klamath River. Photo: Ben Lehman

From Ríos to Rivers: Two Worlds United for the People of the River!

By Juanita Ringeling Vicuña   |   Dec 18, 2017 December 18, 2017

At first glimpse, the Klamath River in the United States’ Pacific Northwest and the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia, South America, seem to have nothing in common. Separated by more than 10,000 miles, their waters drain basins that are drastically different. One river begins in a sagebrush desert before weaving… Read More

There is Trump and There is the Truth

There is Trump and There is the Truth

By Corley Kenna   |   Dec 5, 2017 December 5, 2017

Yesterday, the president didn’t just reduce the boundaries of your public lands. He revoked two national monuments. No president has ever done that before. It is widely unpopular and unprecedented. It is also illegal, and Patagonia will be challenging his action in court. The president also lied. Here is a… Read More

Of course climbing was the main reason I wanted to go to South Africa. Nonetheless, climbing in such a beautiful landscape makes the whole experience about ten times better. Just like my first visit in 2012, I was blown away by the beauty of this sea of black-orange sandstone, the incredible sunsets and sunrises, the stars at night, the animals. Seeing this view every day doesn’t get boring at all and the moment you leave you realize even more how pretty it is. Rocklands, South Africa. Photo: Ken Etzel

Becoming a Boulderer

By Kate Rutherford   |   Dec 4, 2017 December 4, 2017

As a younger climber I was totally committed to big long routes, often in the mountains and often involving a lot of suffering. The beauty of each place is what got me there, and the partnerships kept me there. I wanted to be in those big landscapes, sleeping on the… Read More

Baring our souls to each other in single file conversations. Photo: Colleen Gentemann

How to Disconnect for Deeper Connection

By Cassidy Randall   |   Nov 30, 2017 November 30, 2017

“Disconnect to connect,” Leah Evans says to us, 13 total strangers standing in a circle at a remote trailhead in British Columbia’s Purcell Mountains. We’re about to embark on the inaugural Airplane Mode Camp led by Evans and her dream team of experts: Madeleine… Read More

Photo: Kyle Sparks

Why is Unstructured Play Crucial?

By Patagonia   |   Nov 29, 2017 November 29, 2017

Patagonia has offered corporate-sponsored on-site childcare since 1983. The Great Pacific Child Development Center, GPCDC for short, is where infants and children spend their days crawling, running, climbing and exploring, mostly outdoors, while their parents work. We wanted to tell the story of GPCDC, so last year we published … Read More