The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck Read More

https://www.patagonia.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/grove_g_1168_cc_web-1600x1200.jpg
This Cryptomeria corridor near the Togakushi Shrine in Nagano Prefecture pulls tree-seeking crowds from Tokyo to walk through towering Japanese red-cedar, pay their respects to nature and ask for the protection of something in their lives. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove
LOADING
ERROR
Safety first. Theatrics aside, Carston always wears goggles when bottling the spicier of his sauces—wisdom gained after accidentally squirting some in his eye. Photo: Mary McIntyre

Hurts So Good

By Sakeus Bankson   |   Nov 14, 2019 November 14, 2019

As seen in the November 2019 Journal. For the recipe behind Carston’s Spicy Magic Sauce, scroll to the end of the story. Although my tongue felt as if it might melt, Carston Oliver assured me I was not, in fact, going to die. “That’s just the capsaicin,”… Read More

With Mount Baker peeking over the horizon, Mark Allison (left) and Bonnie Burke (right) get ready to drop in on SST, a Galbraith classic. Photo: Paris Gore

What Good Neighbors Do

By Sakeus Bankson   |   Nov 12, 2019 November 12, 2019

Eric “EB Extreme” Brown scurries up the root wad, surveying the devastation that once was Cougar Ridge Trail. Located on the east side of Lake Whatcom, east of Bellingham, Washington, “Cougar” was once an unsanctioned downhiller trail scheduled for closure. Now it’s one of the area’s premier—and legal—rides. This section,… Read More

Zaria Forman
Lincoln Sea, Greenland,
82° 32' 30.3036

The Art of Loss

By Meaghen Brown   |   Nov 11, 2019 November 11, 2019

It’s fascinating to hear Zaria Forman talk about ice, especially the way that it sounds. She describes the way it rumbles and thunders and cracks, even when you can’t see anything. It crackles and pops like breakfast cereal on high volume. “Ice crispies,” she calls it. “It’s a really beautiful… Read More

During a mountain gourmet lunch stop—meat, cheese, week-old bagels and stone-ground mustard—Nan Cresto, her daughter Sailor Kabeary, Roan Harvey and Cheryl Albrecht-Harvey recharge after a morning of multiple low-angle powder laps during a rest day outing above the Peyto Hut.   Photo: Kennan Harvey

Mountain Fristers

By Kennan Harvey   |   Nov 5, 2019 November 5, 2019

A group of four skiers moves methodically across the snow-covered Wapta Icefield ahead of me in single file connected by a thread-like rope—mothers on each end, Cheryl and Nan, and their two daughters, Roan and Sailor, in the middle. As Roan’s father and Cheryl’s husband, I’m tagging along on this… Read More

@patagonia
Foothills of the Brooks Range in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Photo: Austin Siadak

Where Life Begins

By Clare Gallagher   |   Oct 29, 2019 October 29, 2019

This summer, we–Clare Gallagher, Tommy Caldwell and Luke Nelson–explored, sweated, laughed and even cried in one of America’s greatest national treasures, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We learned from the Gwich’in Nation about how the coastal plains in northeastern Alaska are… Read More

In one month we found a line, hiked all our gear up, attempted a climb, failed, found a new line, ground-up bolted it over seven days, attempted to free it, rescued our climbing partner when he broke his leg, evacuated him from Madagascar, returned to Tsaranoro one partner down, and then freed it over three days, culminating in the first ascent of Blood Moon (5.13c/8a+). Photo: Alastair Lee

Finding Granite and New Limits in Madagascar

By Robbie Phillips   |   Oct 28, 2019 October 28, 2019

I wake early to the dazzling heat of the African sun. Perched 400 meters high on a huge granite face in central Madagascar, all I can see is black and blue, the color of the Malagasy granite meeting the sky and, coincidentally, the same color as large areas of my… Read More

It’s hard to believe that this is Arizona. Len Necefer navigates the blowing snow and rocks along the summit ridge of Dook’o’sliid, the peak that never melts, amidst gale force winds and frigid temperatures. Photo: Greg Balkin

The Summit Which Never Melts

By Len Necefer   |   Oct 25, 2019 October 25, 2019

Snow and icy rime break from the porous black volcanic ridgeline crackling beneath my feet. Gale-force updrafts from the gullied ridges below whip the skis and splitboards strapped to our backs. Each gust forces us to step toward the cornice that hangs above the caldera to our right. The temperature… Read More

For Lindsay Rose Medoff, the idea for ReCrafted has been a dream 11 years in the making. Photo: Lauren Ross

Second Stories

By Patagonia   |   Oct 18, 2019 October 18, 2019

What if we could wear our garbage? That’s the idea behind ReCrafted, our line of clothing made from the scraps of used garments collected at our Worn Wear facility in Reno. It’s premium, Patagonia, upcycled. A second life for products that might not otherwise get one. ReCrafted was created by… Read More

Fifth-generation Nebraskan farmer Del Ficke converted his operation to no till in 1986. A year later, every farm within 10 miles followed suit. Courtesy Del Ficke

Don’t Till on Me

By Andrew O’Reilly   |   Oct 17, 2019 October 17, 2019

Del Ficke is a soil junkie. “It’s like a drug the first time you feel real good soil,” he says. “You get it in your hands and can feel how good it is. You can smell it and taste it. You just want to take a big old hit of… Read More

Sri Lankans outside flooded homes in Kaduwela. The massive storm that hit Sri Lanka in May of 2017 triggered the worst flooding and landslides in 14 years in the southern and western parts of the island. Extreme weather events like this one are increasing in number and strength due to human-caused climate change. Photo: Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images

It’s Time We Prepare Our Workers

By Patagonia   |   Oct 15, 2019 October 15, 2019

Hear “climate crisis” and you may picture a skinny polar bear stranded on a fragment of sea ice, bleached coral reefs, burning forests or maybe a world without bees. You’re not wrong: All those things (and more) are sadly unfolding or could be in the coming decades. Even more troubling,… Read More

The Athabasca oil sands near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. Tar sands are heavy crude oil deposits found mixed with sand, clay and water, which need to be removed through extensive processing. Mining this oil is destructive to the land, carries a heavy carbon footprint and can release toxic by-products. Photo: Ben Nelms/Getty Images

Not Another Pipeline

By Lisset Fun   |   Oct 14, 2019 October 14, 2019

Thirteen youth climate activists are taking to the courts to protect the Mississippi River and the people who depend on it for survival.  Brent Murcia crosses the lively Mississippi River every day by bridge on his walk to class at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. The sunset sometimes paints… Read More

LOADING
ERROR