The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

“We are in survival mode. We’ve got to get to where our forests are not a threat to us anymore.” Read More

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Yosemite Valley moments before rangers were forced to evacuate the park due to the Ferguson fire. Photo: Eric Bissell
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Quinn on January 14, 2018. Estes Park, Colorado. Photo: Tim Davis

Letting Go

By Quinn Brett   |   Oct 8, 2018 October 8, 2018

A climber describes her passion for the wildness of the world. My brother’s cheeks smooshed against the blue velour seat and his mouth hung slightly ajar. His gangly legs stretched from door to door, covering the back bench of our family Buick. On the floor, parallel, I fidgeted over the… Read More

It's not hard to see why Cochamó Valley is often compared to Yosemite. Photo: Drew Smith

Coming to Bat for Cochamó

By Chris Kalman   |   Oct 5, 2018 October 5, 2018

What can I say about Cochamó that hasn’t already been said of a thousand other places before? It’s beautiful, it’s magical, it’s special? How about this: We haven’t messed it up yet. There are lots of beautiful, magical, special places in the world. What we humans tend to do when… Read More

Tania with her two new cubs shortly after their birth. The first jaguars born in decades in Iberá, their arrival was a major milestone for the Jaguar Reintroduction Program. When they’re released into the wild—hopefully within two and a half years—they’ll have access to 650,000 acres of habitat teeming with caimans, capybaras and other native food sources. Photo: Courtesy Tompkins Conservation

Rewilding Iberá

By Sebastián Di Martino   |   Oct 3, 2018 October 3, 2018

It’s spring in the wetlands of Iberá, and two young jaguar cubs appear filled with trepidation and curiosity as they follow their mother, Tania, into the water for their first swim. Aramí, which means “little sky” in the native Guaraní language, and Mbareté, or “strong,” are the first cubs born… Read More

Photo: Greg Von Doersten

Judge Ends Grizzly Hunts with Ruling That’s Bigger Than Bears

By Todd Wilkinson   |   Sep 27, 2018 September 27, 2018

So far in this young century, few wildlife conservation issues have galvanized more Americans than whether or not Western state governments ought to allow grizzly bears to be hunted again. On Monday, September 24, 2018, U.S. District Judge Dana L. Christensen in Missoula, Montana, resolved the matter for the foreseeable… Read More

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Photo: Andrew Burr

The Brave Women of Bosnia

By Molly Baker   |   Sep 26, 2018 September 26, 2018

Activism and the feminine spirit unite to save Europe’s last wild rivers. Mornings in Fojnica, Bosnia-Herzegovina, bring a harmony of Franciscan monastery bells and the broadcast of Fajr prayer, the valley draped in fog and wood smoke. As the fog lifts, hills speckled with the first yellows of fall appear, sloping… Read More

Photo: Tim Davis

Time to Vote

By Rose Marcario, CEO   |   Sep 24, 2018 September 24, 2018

Today, 150 leading companies are coming together in support of a vital common goal: getting more people out to vote. By joining the nonpartisan Time to Vote campaign, businesses from Walmart to Lyft as well as small businesses from coast to coast have made real commitments to help employees and… Read More

We blended recycled wool with micro polyester for a technical fabric that’s lightweight, quick-drying, and soft on the skin. Photo: Tim Davis

Introducing Woolyester

By Kristina Johnson Avery   |   Sep 12, 2018 September 12, 2018

Three years ago, we set out to make a new fleece fabric using natural fibers that were light on the land. Our inspiration came from an old sweater, a weather-beaten merino pullover worn by founder Yvon Chouinard in Patagonia’s early days. It had all the properties that have made wool… Read More

The biointensive garden at Parque Patagonia in summer, from above. More than 30 different crops in an orchestra of flavors. Photo: James Q Martin

The Garden at the End of the World

By Javier Soler   |   Sep 11, 2018 September 11, 2018

If the present status-quo of soil loss, carbon pollution and planetary warming continue, we’re looking at just 60 more harvests before we can no longer grow 95 percent of the food we humans rely upon to live. At the same time, the way to prevent this calamity is at hand:… Read More

Photo: Michael A. Estrada

The Original Tree Huggers

By Michael A. Estrada   |   Sep 4, 2018 September 4, 2018

When you hear the term “tree hugger,” what—or who—do you see? What image, or images, pop into your head? It likely starts with the vague idea of folks who are often—and perhaps overly—passionate about protecting nature. But then, if you expand it, what do they look like? Is it a… Read More

Illustration: Stephen Rockwood

Back Door to Baker

By Krissy Moehl   |   Aug 31, 2018 August 31, 2018

On clear days in the Pacific Northwest, views of Mount Baker depend on the marine layer and the storms. The 10,781-foot snowcapped dome is often obscured by the shifting weather, and though I’d grown up looking at the mountain, I didn’t see it much this year. But when Jeremy Wolf… Read More

San Rafael Wilderness. Photo: Matthew R. Sayles

Bright Spots and Battlegrounds for California Conservation

By Obi Kaufmann   |   Aug 29, 2018 August 29, 2018

Depending on how you look at it, California’s most beloved wildlands are either under siege or experiencing a wellspring of support. In the current political atmosphere, bursting with assaults on bedrock environmental laws and protected public lands, it seems particularly important to recognize and spread the word about whatever pockets… Read More

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