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Thousands took to the streets around the world during the global day of strike on March 15, 2019. In France, organizers counted more than 350,000 people who joined strikes across the country, with 45,000 people marching in Paris. In this photo, youth hold banners reading 'no nature, no future' during the strike in Paris. Photo by Thomas SAMSON/AFP/ Getty Images
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Sandstone features on the northern border of the Diné reservation. Photo: Ace Kvale

Why Run

By Meaghen Brown   |   Apr 5, 2019 April 5, 2019

Some time in the northern corner of the Diné reservation helps clarify why this question is so hard to answer. A girl wakes and runs toward the light, her dark hair streaming behind her as she races in the direction of the rising sun. She hears the prayers of her… Read More

The population of the High Atlas is concentrated in small villages, but it’s far more common to see donkeys and other livestock on the paths running through each. Chris Kehmeier and Leilani Bruntz take a well-trod exit near the village of Toulkine. Photo: Leslie Kehmeier

Ask Where The Mules Go

By Leilani Bruntz   |   Apr 4, 2019 April 4, 2019

Following ancient pathways in Morocco’s High Atlas Mountains. According to our local guide, Samir Ahmoudou, to travel anywhere in Morocco’s Atlas Mountains, you only need to know three Amazigh words: sow, gow, ich—“eat, sleep, drink.” Hospitality will take care of the rest. Such advice seems simple to the point of… Read More

Mountain runner Kílian  Jornet blazes down the north ridge of Täschhorn in Switzerland. Along  with Steve House and Scott Johnston, he’s leading the “anti-fad” training movement for mountain athletes. Photo: Steve House

Seven Recommendations for Trail Racing and Training

By Kílian Jornet   |   Mar 30, 2019 March 30, 2019

Patagonia is thrilled to publish Steve House and Scott Johnston’s second training book, Training for the Uphill Athlete, for which they teamed up with world-class endurance athlete Kílian Jornet. This is an excerpt from the book, now available in Patagonia stores, on Patagonia.com, and at your favorite… Read More

Photo: Ben Moon

Fighting for That Last Bear

By Patagonia   |   Mar 28, 2019 March 28, 2019

Is it possible you’re reading this on The Cleanest Line and it’s the first you’re hearing of Doug Peacock? Is that even possible? Well, if so, you’re in for a real treat. In his latest film, Grizzly Country, Ben Moon creates a portrait of… Read More

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Come to Papa. Leads gets a lift from Mom, Sherry, in 1995. Turtle Rock, Joshua Tree National Park, California. Photo: Greg Epperson

Where She Landed

By Bonnie Tsui   |   Mar 28, 2019 March 28, 2019

Jordan Leads wants everybody to know she is alive and well. When she was six months old, she had her picture taken with her family at Joshua Tree’s Turtle Rock: a baby in midair, swaddled in a puffy purple jumpsuit, thrown over a disturbingly large gap between boulders. (Her parents,… Read More

Tongass National Forest, Alaska. Photo: Amy Gulick

The Shutdown Isn’t Over

By Elliott Woods   |   Mar 15, 2019 March 15, 2019

For 34 days in December and January, the government shutdown not only impaired the livelihoods of 800,000 federal employees, it brought almost the entire federal scientific apparatus to a halt. Worse, there are indicators that the Trump administration willingly took advantage of the shutdown to expedite strategic projects in the… Read More

Thousands of domesticated hatchery salmon are released into the San Francisco Bay. Photo: Ben Moon

The Best Hatchery Is a Healthy River

By Dylan Tomine   |   Mar 14, 2019 March 14, 2019

We are killing what we love. The vast system of hatcheries and open-water fish farms we’ve built is an expression of our affection for cold-water fish—as food, as recreation, as commercial resource. And yet, despite our best intentions, these human-engineered attempts to make up for resource extraction, development and dam… Read More

In business to save our home planet, Patagonia owner/founder Yvon Chouinard. Photo: Jimmy Chin

What’s at Stake Is the Future of Humankind

By Patagonia   |   Mar 14, 2019 March 14, 2019

“Forget Mars,” Yvon Chouinard said recently—although, come to think of it, he might have used a stronger f-word. Our founder was responding to a glib idea that comes up from time to time in conversations about the climate crisis—that if we exhaust the Earth as a habitat for humans, we’ll… Read More

Alexandria started striking against climate inaction on December 14, 2018. She was inspired by Greta Thunberg’s Friday protests in front of the Swedish Parliament. She usually sits on this bench nearby the UN Headquarters in New York City with her two signs. “Most people pass me by, but some stop and ask me to tell them about my signs. One Swedish girl saw me one day and said she knew Greta and the student strike movement. We took a photo and she cried.” Photo: Joel Caldwell

Adults, Change Is Coming Whether You Like It or Not

By Alexandria Villaseñor   |   Mar 11, 2019 March 11, 2019

Alexandria Villaseñor is a 13-year-old climate justice activist and one of three lead organizers, together with Isra Hirsi and Haven Coleman, of US Youth Climate Strike. She is part of a global movement of students who are striking from school to protest inaction on climate change. The global… Read More

Was Meñakoz a legitimate big-wave spot? Photo: Tony Butt collection

An Englishman in Euskadi

By Tony Butt   |   Mar 11, 2019 March 11, 2019

It was November 1991. I was with two friends and we were at the beginning of a three-month surf trip around the coasts of Spain and Portugal. Mundaka was our starting point. We all agreed that we would be happy just to get something better than the cold, windblown beach… Read More

Some wilderness is wilder than others. According to the U.S. Forest Service, “The Bob” has a higher density of grizzly bears than anywhere in the country outside of Alaska. Wolves, mountain lions and other large mammals also call it home—a fact that might put a spring in one’s step while running some of the 1,800+ miles of remote, foot-and stock-only trails. Bob Marshall Wilderness Area, Montana. Photo: Steven Gnam

Measure of Time

By Meaghen Brown   |   Mar 7, 2019 March 7, 2019

For the slo-mo, bug-bitten, exhausted joy of really long runs. Time expands and compresses on long runs. Moments of navigation or extended discomfort can seem endless, while the landscape sifts by like a slow-moving picture. And then suddenly it’s been hours that slipped by without you noticing, except for… Read More

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