The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

"Cochamó is not just the most beautiful place I’ve ever been. It’s somewhere with an uncertain future." Read More

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It's not hard to see why Cochamó Valley is often compared to Yosemite. Photo: Drew Smith
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“After the AT and PCT, I discovered one tiny hole from a campfire in my shorts. Patagonia repaired them for free, no questions asked, with a new pink patch.” Photo: Laura Johnston

My Pink Baggies

By Laura Johnston   |   May 2, 2018 May 2, 2018

Dear Patagonia, My pink Patagonia Baggies Shorts are the best shorts I’ve ever owned. In 2016, I wore them for 180 straight days when thru-hiking the 2,189.1-mile Appalachian Trail (AT); and in 2017, I wore them for 135 days while thru-hiking the 2,650.1-mile Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). I wore them… Read More

Colin Haley climbs Afanassieff Ridge on the west face of Chaltén. Photo: Austin Siadak

Images from the Chaltén Climbing Season

By Colin Haley   |   Apr 26, 2018 April 26, 2018

On the Argentine side of the Patagonian Andes, the Chaltén Massif is a dense range of extremely steep mountains, famous for Cerro Torre and Chaltén itself (the native name for the peak also known as Fitz Roy). I have been coming to this mountain range on an annual basis since… Read More

Walker Ferguson laid low by a high-quality effort. Tuolumne Meadows, California. Photo: Jeff Johnson

Three Hours, Max

By Will Leith   |   Apr 17, 2018 April 17, 2018

The map showed an unbroken line contoured to the ridge. We started running along that line and ran past its end, into a space between two worlds. A few orange ribbons hung on branches in natural openings, marking what might eventually be the beginning of a trail. We followed it. Read More

Bob Brown is the founder of the Australian Green Party. He and his foundation have been fighting for decades to protect takayna / Tarkine. Photo: Krystle Wright

World Heritage Protection for the takayna / Tarkine

By Dr. Bob Brown   |   May 8, 2018 May 8, 2018

Nearly two centuries ago, Henry David Thoreau wrote that “In wildness is the preservation of the world.” I first went deep into the forests of northwestern Tasmania in 1973 in an unsuccessful search for the Tasmanian tiger. That wonderful creature is now accepted as extinct, but the takayna / Tarkine remains… Read More

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Simon navigating toward the block of rock atop the Cairn Gorm plateau. Photo: Kelly Cordes

Into the Whiteout

By Kelly Cordes   |   Apr 16, 2018 April 16, 2018

It had been a while. I don’t climb in weather like this. I stay inside and drink coffee. But I dutifully marched through the whiteout, following Simon as he navigated by compass toward the highland plateau of Cairn Gorm. He was searching for a particular block of rock, from which… Read More

I am not sure I would be on this path to brain surgery had I never chosen to take up paddling, and eventually used it as a tool to raise awareness about the silent disease. Photo: Luke Williams

Paddling with a Purpose

By Jared Muscat   |   Apr 12, 2018 April 12, 2018

Last year I decided to truly dig in to my effort to raise awareness about epilepsy, a disease that affects 1 out of every 26 people in the United States, by using my social media and long-distance paddling skills. I worked hard to prepare for a 17-mile paddle, reached out… Read More

Built in 1959, the Idbar Dam cracked soon after its construction. Investors and construction crews had ignored multiple warnings from the locals not to underestimate the force of the Bašćica, a river known to be unpredictable and fast-flowing. Idbar was decommissioned soon after it was constructed, when the river began fracturing the dam, allowing the Bašćica to flow freely again. Konjic, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Andrew Burr

Telling the Dam Truth

By Yvon Chouinard   |   Apr 9, 2018 April 9, 2018

Europe’s last remaining wild rivers are at grave risk. This time the danger isn’t coming from excessive drought or factories dumping toxic waste—it’s coming from the very hydropower dams that claim to bring us clean, green, renewable energy. The fact is, dams are dirty—and their destructive impact far outweighs their… Read More

The first few inches of the 16 we left behind on our way to Sun Valley. Photo: Kern Ducote

Better Than We Knew

By Kern Ducote   |   Apr 5, 2018 April 5, 2018

After 48 days in the same vehicle with the same four people, five if you count Brandon’s second shadow and beloved dog Rudy (half dog, half human), one is ready for a week of weekends. We romped around for the better part of the last two months, running from Squaw… Read More

La Caldera: big, windy and empty. Photo: Miguel Arribazalaga, 2013

The Paradox of Schrödinger’s Peak

By Tony Butt   |   Apr 3, 2018 April 3, 2018

It was about an hour before dark. The spot had been a lot easier to find than I thought—five minutes from the main road and within easy viewing distance from a cliff. A few weeks earlier a friend had told me he had seen “something breaking” along this stretch of… Read More

It Was Always About Oil, Coal, Gas and Uranium

It Was Always About Oil, Coal, Gas and Uranium

By Lisa Pike Sheehy   |   Mar 29, 2018 March 29, 2018

In December of 2017, the president illegally reduced Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments by nearly two million acres. Despite overwhelming support from the majority of Americans, nearly three million of whom spoke up during a public comment period in favor of protecting our national monuments,… Read More

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